Sunday, 16 August 2009

The London/Kent Border. Horns Green

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 45 59 An area of scattered housing and woodlands
Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
From the edge of Broom Wood the boundary goes south to then run on the western edge of Little Jockey’s Wood at Horns Green and there crosses a footpath. It continues south with a slight deviation to the west and zig zags to join Cudham Lane South soon after Portlands and continue down it.

The boundary has now reached near the top of the escarpment, although you would never know it, and is beginning to turn downhill. More posh housing disguised as farms, and some not disguised at all.


Post to the north Letts Green
Post to the south The Nower

On the border
Cudham Lane South
Portlands. Listed group which includes an oast house and drying shed. Also stable buildings and a cottage. Built c.1840 but the stucco house has its back to the road. At the rear is an 18th wing in brick and flint. Oast is early 19th with a drying shed used as a stable. There is a flight of steps up the side of the oast to link with an encircling wall, all in brick and flint. The whole, with the cottage and the stables form a square round a courtyard. All listed.

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the border
Burlings Lane
Baston Wood
Burlings. Listed outhouse and garden wall north of Burlings Cottage. Early 19th outbuildings in flint and rubble with red brick vertical bands,
Burlings Cottage. Late 18th cottage.listed. one storey plus a basement. Four steps with an ornamental cast iron railing. Garage extension.
Franklow. Late 19th cottage with flint rubble walls and red brick dressings. Listed.

Horns Green
Marked thus on maps of 1821 and 1871, to be associated with the family of John de Horne 1292, whose name derives from Old English horn 'a horn-shaped feature, a projecting piece of land'.
The most southeasterly point in London. Part of the holdings of the Earl of Derby. Sold by the 17th earl in 1909.

Knockholt Wood

Royal Oak Hill
Royal Oak

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. In this area I would like to mention an excellent history of Knockholt by David Waldron Smithers.

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