Saturday, 22 August 2009

The London/Surrey Border - Pimlico - Biggin Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 59 41 Suburban and largely down market Biggin Hill

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary goes north west from the east side of the kennels between The Grove and Ricketts Hill emerging at Eagles Drive. At the junction it turns sharply south west down Lusted Hall Lane.

Biggin Hill is what it is - and it is typical of this makeshift community around an airfield that the vicar had to buy a second-hand church and rebuild it himself. The boundary follows through.

Post to the west Norheads Lane
Post to the south Tatsfield



On the London, Bromley side of the border
Biggin Hill
Biggin Hill 'hill with or by a building' Middle English ‘ bigging’, Old English.

Church Road
St.Mark's. Built in 1957-9 with materials from the demolished Victorian church of All Saints, North Peckham. For the previous 50 years old worshippers had used an iron hut which the Minister, Rev. V. Symons, demolished and then rebuilt it all moving it in a lorry, bit by bit by himself. The original Peckham church had been designed by Giles Gilbert Scott in yellow brick It has a detached bell tower and the design has been governed by the need to re-use the old nave roof. All the windows were engraved by the vicar copying woodcuts from the early c15 German Biblia Pauperurn with a dentists drill. He also made the plate and altar cross in which there are 53 wedding rings.

Stock Hill
Two cottages

Kings Road
Flying Machine pub. Modern.

Lebanon Gardens
Named by developer Dougal after a road in Wandsworth

Lusted Lane
The boundary is an ancient road. 700 feet up.
Lusted was ‘Lovestedesdoune’ in 1402, ‘Lovested’ 1545, ‘Lusested’ 1552, ‘Lustead Farm’ 1819. This was probably -pasture or a farm of a man called Lufa'. However it is possible that it means. 'love', in which case it might refer to a pleasant place, or a 'morning gift' or dowry, or even somewhere secluded for lovemaking.
Parsons Shaw

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. I would like to note some short histories of Biggin Hill and some web sites.

No comments: