Monday, 30 August 2010

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle - The Bourne Tributary - Kenley

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Bourne tributary continues flowing underground and unseen towards the Wandle.


Post to the west Reedham
Post to the north Purley
Post to the east Riddlesdown


Cross Road
School converted to housing

Godstone Road
A22 this is the old Lewes Road the ancient road into Sussex
Oakwood School. Private Catholic ‘prep’ school.

Higher Drive
Recreation Ground. A park managed by Croydon Council. It is made up of two fields– the first taken over in 1925 and the second in 1953. A hedge runs between the two parts, once part of a field path crossing the area.
69 St.Barnabas Church. Church of 1958 replacing a 19th building

Little Roke Avenue
Mission Hall built 1903 by Ashburner. Used as a community and parish hall since 1915.

Northwood Avenue
Foxley Hall. Built by oil and cake merchant, George Armstrong in 1875. It later became the property of the Densham, Mazawattee Tea, family. Since replaced by housing.
Foxley Wood. Owned and managed by the London Borough of Croydon. It is recorded as ‘Foxele’ in 1279, ‘and by the 16th it was called ‘Great Foxley’ and ‘Lyttle Foxley’. It means a ‘wood frequented by foxes'. It includes an area called Sherwood Oak. Pond with circular brick edging.
Quarry above Foxley Hall used for gravel extraction and subsequently as the municipal tip
Reedham Drive
Reedham School. The Asylum for Fatherless Children was founded by Andrew Reed in 1844 initially in Richmond. In 1856 they were able to build a new and grand school in what became known as Reedham. By 1950 it was called Reedham School but closed in 1979.
St.Nicholas School.
Beaumont School. On the site of Reedham School
St.James Road
St.James Church

Sylverdale Road
Methodist Church

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle - The Bourne - Reedham

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Bourne tributary runs through this area, roughly following the Brighton Road


Post to the south Smitham
Post to the east Kenley


Brighton Road
Once this whole stretch of road was Smitham, or Smithden, Bottom. It was a dangerous stretch and included a gibbet for local highwaymen.
The Bourne flooded in 1930 and the road was under water between Old Lodge Lane and Stoats Nest.Town Hall. Offices of the Coulsdon and Purley Urban District Council, in red brick, 1928-30 by W B Nicholl and B. Hughes and planned around a garden courtyard. Listed grade II as also are railings outside.
Air raid shelters for the Town Hall
88 Telephone Exchange92 Regal Cinema. Part of the ABC chain opened in 1934. The architect was Harold Scott. It had a café with oak sinks, which was used later by a dance school. There was a cinema cat. It became a bingo hall in 1978 and closed in 1998. It has been demolished and the site is now shops, but some of it remains within the telephone exchange.
Fitness First was the site of the Ice Rink which. Became the Orchid Ballroom in 1960 and closed in 1973. Many famous pop music acts played there.
Fire Station

Downlands Road
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway ran west of Downlands Road, but crossed to the east side roughly half way down going through the footpath which crosses it and continues the Downlands Road, moving again to the west side and reach Smitham Downs Road west of the junction.

Drive Mead
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway ran just to the south of it.

Old Lodge Lane
Reedham Station. Opened 1911. Between Purley and Smitham on Southern Trains. Built as a halt on the Tattenham Corner line near the Reedham Home for Fatherless Children and opened for visitors to the orphanage. 1936 proper station built.
Sidings for the orphanage were on the up side
Anti tank concrete cubes along the railway line
Old Lodge Farm stood near where the tennis courts are in the park. It was owned by the Halls, lime works owners, and grew wheat which was processed at Beddington Mill, swedes and mangolds grown there were sent out via Stoats Nest Goods Yard. The farm land stretched from the Orphanage to Caterham Drive.
Cottages opposite the farm were owned by the Orphanage and lived in by their workers.

Reedham
Named from the Reedham Orphanage which is marked as “Reedham Asylum” on the Ordnance Survey map of 1878. It had been founded in 1856 by the Revd Andrew Reed and demolished in 1980.

Reedham Drive
Reedham Asylum for Fatherless Children. Sited south and east of the railway and named after its founder, Rev. Andrew Reed, who set up the foundation in 1844, one of several such projects he was involved in. The school was originally in Richmond and moved here in 1858. It was renamed Reedham Orphanage in 1904 and Reedham School in 1950. It was closed in 1979 but the Trust continues to fund those in need. The amazing Victorian buildings were demolished, apart from the Lodge.

Smitham Downs Road
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway crossed the road from Downlands Road, to the west of the junction.

South Drive
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway ran to the east of South Drive.

Stoats Nest Road.
Stoats Nest Station. Opened 12th July 1841 on the London and Brighton Railway at the North side of the railway line. In 1856 it closed and was replaced by a new station to the south. Remains of it could be seen on the down side before the junction with Tattenham Corner branch

The Drive
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway crossed the site of the Drive after crossing Smitham Downs Road and the Vale and then followed the line of the road. It left before the junction with Drive Mead

The Vale
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Tramway crossed what is now Smitham Downs Road and then crossed the line of the Vale.

Thames Tributary Wandle - The Bourne - Smitham

Thames Tributary Wandle.
The Bourne, the Wandle tributary, flows through this area, underground, roughly on the line of the Brighton Road.

Post to the west Coulsdon
Post to the north Reedham


Brighton Road
The track through Smitham, then called Smitham Bottom, was turnpiked in 1803. By 1820 40 coaches a day were going through.
Methodist Church. By Gordon & Gunton. Gothic church in flint and stone, with chequered gable and a tower

Byron Avenue
Named after Edward Byron who lived at Coulsdon Court

Cearn Way
Charles Cearn bought Coulsdon Court when Byron died and developed it as a golf course. The line of the road was the tradesman’s entrance.

Coulsdon Road

Coulsdon Court Road
This was on the line of the main drive to Coulsdon Court.
Coulsdon Court. Built by the Byron family in the 1850s on the site of Hartley House. When Edward Byron died in 1922 it was sold and bought by the Cearn family, and it was laid out as a golf course by Harry Colt and then leased to Croydon Council for a municipal golf course. Coulsdon Court Golf Club was formed in 1938. The first golf buggies in England were used there.
Coulsdon Manor Hotel – in what was Coulsdon Court

Hartley Down
Named for Hartley House which stood on the Coulsdon Court site

Hartley Farm Estate.
New Hartley farmhouse built 1850, now a private house. It was a dairy farm until 1921

Marlpit Lane
Halls maintained a trading depot here from 1923

Petersfield
This was named like this as farmland – part of ‘Old Peter’s Threescore Acres’

Railway Lines
The line to Tattenham Corner from Purley runs parallel to the Brighton Line and then turns west from Smitham Station crossing the Brighton road and up the Chipstead Valley.

Smitham Bottom
In 1331 this was recorded a ‘Smefheden’ 1331, but by 1588 it was ‘Smythden Bottom’ 1588 which means 'smooth valley'.

Station Approach
Site of Coulsdon North Station. Opened in December 1899 by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway. Its original name was ‘Stoat’s Nest’ and it replaced an earlier Stoat’s Nest Station, which was further north. The Entrance was on the east side of Station Approach off the Brighton Road There was a bad rail crash here in 110 and in 1911 it was renamed ‘Coulsdon and Smitham Downs’. In 1923 called ‘Coulsdon West’ and month later ‘Coulsdon North’. It had been built both as a terminus and a through station and changed little. When the Brighton Line was reconfigured it was surplus, with two other stations nearby and it was closed in 1983. The Coulsdon by-pass now runs through the site but the footbridge remains.

Stoats Nest Road
Stoats Nest Quarry owned by Halls.

Stoats Nest Village
Laid out for ex-service men 1919 and instigated by Edward Byron of Coulsdon Court

Ullswater Trading Estate
Site of Halls lime works. The Hall family had been active in the Croydon area as coal and lime merchants since the 18th. In the mid-1860s they leased an area of land in Coulsdon and transferred their lime burning works here in 1864 from Redhill. They also quarried for chalk here and had a trade in flints also. The works had its own internal railway system. Experiments were carried out on a gas fired kiln in 1865. One kiln was known as Mrs.Maybrick following a murder. Priest kilns and hydrating plant installed in 1937

Windermere Road
Smitham Station. Opened 1st January 1904. Between Reedham and Woodmansterne South on Southern Trains. No station houses just a wooden building on the down side and a sort of shelter on the up side in Southern Railway ‘country’ style. It took three years to build it and open it. It was only opened because it was required under the act and the requirements of the trustees of John Benjamin Smith.
Goods yard

Sunday, 29 August 2010

Thames Tributary – The Wandle -The Bourne - Coulsdon

Thames Tributary – The Wandle
The westerly arm of the Bourne flows underground through this area to the Wandle
TQ 29729 59430

The Brighton Road as it goes through the small town of Coulsdon, with the Bourne flowing the underground, and remains of the remains of the early 19th tramway


Post to the west Chipstead Valley Road
Post to the east Smitham
Post to the south Cane Hill

A23
The A23 now bypasses Coulsdon, on a road opened in 2006 which runs to the east of the Brighton Road alongside, and west of, the railway. It goes through the site of Coulsdon North Station

Brighton Road
After the road was turnpiked the centre of Coulsdon moved to this area, which had previously been known as Smitham Bottom. In 1331 it is ‘Smetheden’. Before the turnpike road was built in 1803 the road to here from The Swan and Sugarloaf was called Smitham Bottom. Southwards it was Hooley Lane.
Hooley Lane Turnpike gate was set up roughly where the road from Cane Hill is in 1803. There was a duplicate turnpike built in 1807
Turnpike milestone, dates from 1820
Railway - The road is crossed Road crossed the Brighton Line and by the Quarry Line which duplicated the Brighton Line in 1900
Coulsdon South Station. 1889. Between Purley and Main Line destinations on Southern Trains Originally ‘Coulsdon’ there were also a covered way, since demolished, thought to be for the hospital. In 1923 it was renamed ‘Coulsdon South’. On the original main line - between two railway lines. In December 2000 the Bourne stream rose and ran through this area.
Leaden Cross. The area was once called this, probably after a cross on the boundary. It is also known that a direction sign once stood here defaced by Cromwellian soldiers. There was also a gibbet here.
Red Lion pub. Built 1680, it originally stood opposite the Leaden Cross. The Bourne is said to have run underneath the pub. The pub was for a while a coaching inn and also had special facilities for freemasons. It was demolished in 2002.
163 Janes Information Group – world wide shipping etc, This is on the site of a pumping station built in the 1930s to cope with flooding in the valley, and to provide for a growing population.
Embankment - Car park, only bit of Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway embankment left
Veteran car rally stop since 1901.

Chipstead Valley Road
Embankment. Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway crossed roughly at the point where the Elim Chapel now stands. It was on a high embankment and bridge. The tramway, Built between 1803 and 1805, had been steadily rising since it left Purley built needed to cross this valley – it is thought to have been thirty feet high and half a mile long. .This was the first such embankment built on southern England. Engineer Jessop also built a bridge which crossed the road itself. This was a single arch of brick and flint, built by the Butterely Company and reinforced with iron ribs. The bridge was demolished as dangerous in 1854.
St.Aiden. Roman Catholic Church. This was begun in 1931 by Adrian Scott to replace the church in Woodcote Grove. It was to be a Gothic church but only the first phase was completed and the church remained in debt. In the 1960s it was decided to start again but with a completely new modern style church by Buries, Newton & Partners.
Church Hall. This is on the site of a temporary building put up during building work and then used as a hall.
Elim Chapel. Stands at the point where the tramway crossed the road and some of the embankment was demolished for it. Now in other use.
Smitham Bottom Infants School opened in 1893 as an Infants school on Land given by Squire Edmund Byron. In 1905 Coulsdon and Purley Smitham Bottom Council Mixed School opened in premises close by but moved by 1908.

Footpath between Woodmansterne Road and Chipstead Valley Road
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway crossed it at the point where it crosses the railway, having followed the line of what is now the railway. It then curved south east towards Woodman Road

Lion Green
One of the homes of early cricket, The Coulsdon Cricket Club dates from 1762 and in 1783 there was a ‘cricket shed’ near the pub. The club moved as the area became built up in the 1880s.
Bare knuckle fighting. In 1788 Jackson and Feweterel fought here in front of the Prince of Wales.
Embankment – in car park. The remains of the embankment of the Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway is at the rear of the Lion Green car park. The line passed through here having crossed Chipstead Valley Road. What is left is covered in trees and eroded.
Coulsdon Area Farm. On some of the site of Cane Hill Farm. The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway passed through the site where the farm was later built. The farm was originally to provide produce for the hospital and an occupation for the patients. Sold off in the 1950s when policy changed. Later known as Portnalls Farm
Smitham School – in 1886 an Infants school opened in temporary premises in what had been Cane Hill Mission Room C. of E. Infants School.

Malcolm Road
1-3 Bijou Cinema. Built 1913 as the Palladium, and a number of other owners and names – the Bohemia and the Plaza. In 1923 it reopened and had more owners to close in 1932. It never had any equipment for sound.
Coulsdon and Purley Smitham Bottom Council Mixed School opened in 1908 and various reorganisations followed. It is now an adult education centre.

Portnalls Road
Smitham Primary School
St.Aiden’s Catholic Primary School


South Drive
Route of Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway - the line ran parallel and west of the Brighton Road and east of South Drive. It then veered slightly to the south west and crossed South Drive about two thirds down its length and continued towards The Grove.

Station Approach
This was the approach to the now demolished Coulsdon North Station.
Railway housing of 1899. Has a varied roof-line with deep eaves.
Coulsdon North locomotive depot. Opened in 1900 by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway at the south end of Coulsdon North Station. Brick built shed with a water tank, coal stage. Closed 1929 but some buildings remained into the 1980s.
Coulsdon North Goods Depot. Included railway turntable

The Avenue
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway crossed it at junction with The Grove and continued in a south westerly direction

The Grove
Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway crossed it at junction with The Avenue

Woodman Road
The Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway crossed the road

Woodcote Grove Road
This was known as Smitham Bottom Road.
Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway coming from the junction of the Grove and The Avenue, crossed the road slightly before where road today crosses the Tattenham Corner bound railway. It then continued following what is now the line of the railway south west bound.
St.Andrews Church. On the corner of Woodmansterne Road. It was built in 1911 by Greenaway and Newberry. It has a tower with battlements and a flagstaff and nightly illuminations.
Coulsdon Martial Arts Centre. This is on the site of what was originally a ‘tin’ church built by the Roman Catholic Church in 1916. In 1922 this was replaced with a church, St.Aiden’s, which was built of ‘Merstham firestone’ taken from a barn on Stoat’s Nest Farm. This church later became the Co-op Hall but now has oriental dragons on the façade.

Sources
Bayliss. The Surrey Iron Railway
Bourne Society. Journal
Cinema Treasures. Web site
Coulsdon Martial Arts Centre. Web site
Janes's. Web site
St.Aiden Church. Web site
St. Andrew's Church. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. London South
Pub History. Web site
Smitham School. Web site

Monday, 23 August 2010

Thames Tributary Wandle - the western arm of the Bourne.

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
A tributary apparently coming from Hooley flows through the area underground

TQ 29972 58238

Suburban area around the A23, Brighton Road, and including some of The City of London's Farthingdown open space. It also includes the remains of Cane Hill Hospital - an all including mental hospital built on the hillside outside Coulsdon.


Post to the west Portnalls
Post to the north Coulsdon
Post to the south Dutch Village

Ashbourne Close
This follows the line of the pre-18409 turnpike road. After the diversion for the railway it became the drive to Hooley House
Lodge of Hooley House on the Woodplace Lane corner. Locally listed. This marks the site of the turnpike gate.
The road was once lined with Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway sleepers
Hooley House. First mentioned in 1203 and then belonged to Chertsey Abbey. The house was built in 1749 but it was later bought up and much of the grounds taken up for railway building. In the 20th it became the Ashdown Park Hotel but was bought by the Department of Transport, neglected and demolished in 1971.

Brighton Road
The road was built in 1808 as a turnpike by Joliffe and Banks following the route of the Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway and was used by Royal Mail coaches from 1810. It goes through the Hooley Gap and was followed on this route by two railway lines.
The original route of the turnpike road was different from the line followed by the current road. Originally it curved to the east to avoid the slight hill ahead but had to change in the 1840s to accommodate the railway.
The track of the Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway can be seen to the west of the Brighton Road. Its’ course was the lower of two terraces on the field to the west. It curved across the field going towards
Hollymeoak Road.

Cane Hill
Cane Hill Hospital. An imposing building on a hilltop. It was built in 1882 as the third mental hospital in Surrey. It was designed by Charles Henry Howell who had also built Surrey’s Brookwood hospital, and was the leading architect in this field. It was designed to be as self sufficient as possible and patients were employed in farm and domestic work and was considered to be a showplace. It was eventually transferred to the London County Council. From 1980 it was run down and allowed to become derelict. Demolished.
Route of Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway ran from what was the hospital car park down to what was the main drive, crossed it and went down to the railway line. It continued parallel and west of the main road

Downs Road
Originally called Fanfare Road to mark the coronation of Edward VII, changed to Downs Road in1910.

Fairdene Road
Fairdene was an alternative name for Farthingdown

Farthingdown
This is also called Fairdean Downs.  It is owned by the City Corporation. The Lord of the Manor wanted to enclose it and the City Corporation bought the rights through Act of Parliament.
Car park, toilets, signs of the commons last 35 offences.
Droveway along the centre with Iron Age and early Roman enclosures. This includes Saxon levels and a British field system,
2 Saxon burial areas. 16 barrows in all.
Folly – clump of beech trees
Millennium Cairn with a time capsule.

Hollymeoak Road,
View of the track line of the Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway from gate below the telephone exchange roughly where it crossed.
Telephone Exchange

Reddown
This was named like this as farmland

Woodplace Lane

Sources
Bayliss. The Surrey Iron Railway
Bourne Society. Newsletter
Corporation of the City of London. Web site
Derelict London. Web site
Field. London Place Names
London Borough of Croydon. Web site
Lost Hospitals of London. Web site

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle - the Bourne - Riddlesdown

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Bourne tributary continues to flow underground along and south of Godstone Road.

Post to the west Reedham
Post to the south Kenley


Coombe Wood Hill
Coombe Wood

Downs Court Road
Probably continues the Roman Road which crosses Riddlesdown

Godstone Road.
Kenley Station. 1856 Between Purley and Whyteleafe on Southern Rail. Once called ‘Coulsdon’ but it is older than this. The platforms are below road level, with a brick ticket office on the up-side. Stairs lead down to the platform and a footbridge to the down platform. There is a listed deep gabled station house by architect Richard Whittall – it is like the original one at Caterham. This house was sold to in 2007 and the original wooden waiting room on the down platform was demolished and replaced with a small modern shelter.
62 Kenley Hotel. Mirrored bar destined for the Titanic.
Cricket Ground – Southern Railway and Kenley Cricket Club.
Riddlesdown Caves. Used as air raid shelters in the Second World War. Used by Optical Surfaces - instrument makers because of the constant temperature and lack of vibration.
Kenley Memorial Hall. War memorial community centre.
Police Station with decorative plaques. Said to be the oldest building used by the Met. Police it dates from 1896. Locally listed.

Little Roke Road
Little Roke. The name ‘Roke’ is first noted in 1550 and derives from the Middle English word for 'place at the oak tree' and there are two ancient oaks by the railway footbridge, one c.400 and one c900 years old. Earlier it is found in the name of Adam atte Roke in 1367 and in the field name ‘le Rokegrofe’ in 1431. It is shown on the Ordnance Survey of 1816 together with Roke Farm which was once known as “Great Roke”. There was a small group of terraced houses in the 19th but the area was rebuilt in the 20th.
Roke Primary School. The School dates from the early 1900s but the current site is 1994.

Mitchley Avenue
Saxon graves found at the junction with Riddlesdown Road.

Riddlesdown
The name means cleared woodland - ‘Redelsdon’ in 1277. It is believed that the hillside was once covered with beeches but is now a mix of chalk grassland and scrub. It was sheep or rabbit grazed well into the 20th.
Track along the line of the Roman road from London.- an ancient trackway to the Caterham Valley and beyond to Portslade.
The common and its rights were bought out by the City of London in the 1870s following a legal dispute about common rights between the Lord of the Manor and land owners. Later, as the Corporation acquired other commons, they added more land, including a tenanted farm.
“New Ditch” of unknown origin which is a scheduled ancient monument. There were also once three parallel banks and associated ditches which have since been destroyed by house building.
In the 1820s chalk extraction began on the SW edge of the Down, and only halted in the 1950s.
Trig point alongside the roadway, 525 above sea level.
Rifle range and associated buildings were here in the early 20th
The wooded side of the Down rises to a terrace of grassland with broom quaking grass and sedge along with thyme, kidney vetch, marjoram, and wild parsnip. One important plant on the site is round-headed campion. To the south is an area of improved grassland. Scrub includes spindle, juniper, dogwood, buckthorn and wayfaring tree together with eventual oak woodland with an understorey of ash, whitebeam, hazel and hawthorn. Along the track are some ancient yews, and it should be noted that yews were once planted as markers on boundaries and trackways.
Rail tunnel taking the line between Riddlesdown and Oxted Stations
Tunnels were bored through the chalk as trials for the railway in 1838. They have probably been backfilled and the shafts capped – but they may lead to otherwise unexplained subsidence
119 two burials found here in 1962. Probably from Saxons with toothache.

Roke Road
Little Roke house stood at the southern end of the road.

Thursday, 19 August 2010

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle. The Bourne tributary. Riddlesdown

Thames Tributaries - River Wandle
The Bourne tributary continues to flow underground along and south of Godstone Road.

Post to the west Kenley
Coombe Wood Hill
Coombe Wood

Downs Court Road
Probably continues the Roman Road which crosses Riddlesdown

Godstone Road.
Kenley Station. 1856 Between Purley and Whyteleafe on Southern Rail. Once called ‘Coulsdon’ but it is older than this. The platforms are below road level, with a brick ticket office on the up-side. Stairs lead down to the platform and a footbridge to the down platform. There is a listed deep gabled station house by architect Richard Whittall – it is like the original one at Caterham. This house was sold to in 2007 and the original wooden waiting room on the down platform was demolished and replaced with a small modern shelter.
62 Kenley Hotel. Mirrored bar destined for the Titanic.
Cricket Ground – Southern Railway and Kenley Cricket Club.
Riddlesdown Caves. Used as air raid shelters in the Second World War. Used by Optical Surfaces - instrument makers because of the constant temperature and lack of vibration.
Kenley Memorial Hall. War memorial community centre.
Police Station with decorative plaques. Said to be the oldest building used by the Met. Police it dates from 1896. Locally listed.

Little Roke Road
Little Roke. The name ‘Roke’ is first noted in 1550 and derives from the Middle English word for 'place at the oak tree' and there are two ancient oaks by the railway footbridge, one c.400 and one c900 years old. Earlier it is found in the name of Adam atte Roke in 1367 and in the field name ‘le Rokegrofe’ in 1431. It is shown on the Ordnance Survey of 1816 together with Roke Farm which was once known as “Great Roke”. There was a small group of terraced houses in the 19th but the area was rebuilt in the 20th.
Roke Primary School. The School dates from the early 1900s but the current site is 1994.

Mitchley Avenue
Saxon graves found at the junction with Riddlesdown Road.

Riddlesdown
The name means cleared woodland - ‘Redelsdon’ in 1277. It is believed that the hillside was once covered with beeches but is now a mix of chalk grassland and scrub. It was sheep or rabbit grazed well into the 20th.
Track along the line of the Roman road from London.- an ancient trackway to the Caterham Valley and beyond to Portslade.
The common and its rights were bought out by the City of London in the 1870s following a legal dispute about common rights between the Lord of the Manor and land owners. Later, as the Corporation acquired other commons, they added more land, including a tenanted farm.
“New Ditch” of unknown origin which is a scheduled ancient monument. There were also once three parallel banks and associated ditches which have since been destroyed by house building.
In the 1820s chalk extraction began on the SW edge of the Down, and only halted in the 1950s.
Trig point alongside the roadway, 525 above sea level.
Rifle range and associated buildings were here in the early 20th
The wooded side of the Down rises to a terrace of grassland with broom quaking grass and sedge along with thyme, kidney vetch, marjoram, and wild parsnip. One important plant on the site is round-headed campion. To the south is an area of improved grassland. Scrub includes spindle, juniper, dogwood, buckthorn and wayfaring tree together with eventual oak woodland with an understorey of ash, whitebeam, hazel and hawthorn. Along the track are some ancient yews, and it should be noted that yews were once planted as markers on boundaries and trackways.
Rail tunnel taking the line between Riddlesdown and Oxted Stations
Tunnels were bored through the chalk as trials for the railway in 1838. They have probably been backfilled and the shafts capped – but they may lead to otherwise unexplained subsidence.

Roke Road
Little Roke house stood at the southern end of the road.

Tuesday, 17 August 2010

Thames Tributary Wandle - the Bourne Tributary. Whyteleafe
see
http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2009/08/londonsurrey-boundary-whyteleafe-hill.html

then
http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2009/08/londonsurrey-boundarygodstone-road.html

then
Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Bourne tributary continues to flow north west parallel and south of Godstone Road


Post to the north Kenley
Post to the east Rose and Crown


Bourne View Gardens

Church Road
All Saints church. 1872. The church stands on a steep slope on a man-made standing. Designed by H.W.Fowler. It was extended for Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee and again in 1901 because of population growth. War memorial in the porch for the Great War only.
Church Hall

Hayes Lane
Watendone Manor. Before Domesday Watendone was a separate manor. It passed through a number of hands and the current house was built in the early 20th by the then owner.

Godstone Road
Water Works. In 1885 the Kenley Water Company became part of the East Surrey Company. Site rebuilt in 1989.

Welcomes Road
Welcomes Farm. Stood in the area, the owners paid for the road to be built.

Zigzag Road
Descriptive road name

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle - the Bourne tributary - Whyteleafe South

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Bourne stream continues underground in a northerly direction towards the Wandle.


Post to the west Kenley Commone
Post to the east Bug Hill

The Avenue
This road from Whyteleafe station was built by the railway company as a carriage road for George Padbury, JP who was the owner of the estate and it led to now vanished Manor Cottage.
Caterham and Whyteleafe Tennis Club
Little Manor


Coney Bury Close
This is all that remains of a path which extended from Salmons Lane in the valley,

Court Bushes Road
It is thought possible that this was the alignment of the Roman road, rather than the Godstone Road

Godstone Road
A22 this is the old Lewes Road - the ancient road into Sussex going to iron working sites and on to the coast. It was turnpike in 1718 and became established as the earliest route to Brighton and used by coaches. A bus service was established in 1812. In the 1930s it was turned into an arterial road. In 1967 the road from Wapses Lodge roundabout to Whyteleafe South station was made into a dual carriage way
Bourne stream - south of the roundabout the Bourne is in a concrete culvert on the east side of the road. This culvert becomes square as it to passes under buildings. Before the road was upgraded it ran in an open stream to Well Farm.Wapses Lodge roundabout. In 1939 it was said that this roundabout was the first of its kind in Britain. It has pedestrian subways under the six converging roads which meet in the open submerged centre. During the Second World War it was camouflaged with netting and fir trees were planted. Despite this allied airmen used it the roundabout as a navigational aid back to Kenley airfield. The subways were used as air-raid shelters. There is flooding here in heavy rain. before it was built there was a big pool here when the Bourne flooded.
439 Rank Organisation. offices on stilts. Lot of problems preventing it flooding.
475 Bourne House. Office block standing over the Bourne stream
Toll house on the west side of the roundabout. From the time when this was a coach road.
Coal Tax Post outside 376 Godstone Road, part of the inscription is illegible
Whyteleafe South Station. 1856. Between Whyteleafe and Caterham on Southern Trains. When Caterham railway was built the only station in what is now the village of Whyteleafe was called’ Warlingham’. The Caterham Railway Act had required a station to be built where the railway crossed the road on the level. 'Station House' of 1857, still remains although the station itself was rebuilt in 1862. Its front door is bricked up and has a piece of South Eastern Railway awning over it with a wooden seat under it. In 1956 its name changed to ‘Whyteleafe South’.
Haliloo Platform. This is said to have been a railway halt on the Caterham line which was replaced by Whyteleafe. Closed 1900. The site is not clear but this stretch of line is closed to the Halliloo Valley – but not close to Whyteleafe Station.

Jacobs Ladder
This is an ancient footpath including 200 steps.

Kooringa
This private housing estate seems to be named after a copper mining company village in Burra, New South Wales.

Manor Park.
The name of the park refers to the Manor of Portley. A group of cottages here were part of the manor house – they became the golf course clubhouse but were removed during the Second World War. Now has an Old Surrey Downs sheep grazing Project.
Cloisters

Salmons Lane
Salmons Lane at one time continued across the Godstone Road and the railway – where there was a bridge. It was known as Coney Burrow. In the 1960s the bridge was removed and the path has since disappeared – apart from Coney Bury Close off West View

South View Road
White House. Naturist club founded in 1933.

Succombs Hill
Windmill Shaw. Windmill 1198-1325 and one of the earliest every recorded

Well Farm Road
Well Farm Heights housing estate. Affordable housing designed by Hawkins Brown. Built on a site previously used for offices.
Mountain Pool – there was once a local swimming pool on the Well Farm Heights site
Coal post on the north side 100 yards east of Godstone Road. Gone

Woldingham Road
Wapses Lodge
The Warlingham Borehole a hole was bored 1956-8 for the British Geological Survey. It was 750 feet deep and one of the deepest then ever undertaken. It was in a field near the roundabout and it was to investigate a 'low gravity anomaly' in the vicinity, which might have indicated oil or coal, however nothing was found,

Monday, 16 August 2010

Thames tributary, Wandle - Bourne tributary - Warlingham

Thames Tributary Wandle
The Wandle tributary, Bourne, rises in this area

Post to the west Wapses
Post to the south Woldingham

Bug Hill
Coal Tax Post Outside house 'Waterendlath' (later called ‘Halliloo House’) Very prominent and the plate is intact.
The Bourne - in 1904 it rose at Bugshill Farm and ran down Caterham Valley to SmithamBug Hill Farm. This is 125 feet deep and normally dry, but when the Bourne flows it overflows.


Slines New Road/Halliloo Valley Road
Woldingham Golf Club House on the site of Halliloo Farmhouse. This was previously known as Duke’s Dene.
Halliloo Cottages

Stuart Road
Coal Tax Post. On north east side at junction with Woldingham Road. Opposite, Viaduct Lodge. It is rusty post with its inscription intact but it is half buried.

Woldingham Road
Coal tax post on the west side at the Stuart Road junction

Sunday, 15 August 2010

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle - The Bourne, Woldingham Road

Thames Tributaries – the River Wandle
The Wandle Tributary, the Bourne, is said to rise in this area. It is an intermittent stream


Post to the north Bug Hill


Birch Wood
The Bourne rises here in a wet summer. As woe waters it is said to flow for 30 days towards Croydon, and then changes to flow towards West Wickham.

Woldingham Road
Five-arched brick viaduct built at the time of the Surrey and Sussex Junction Railway.
Bourne - flood waters collecting underneath the viaduct. It is said that the Bourne’s source is here.Viaduct Cottage at the foot of the viaduct on the north-east side of the road which looks like former railway property. It is sometimes called The Mumbles
Viaduct Lodge
Rosedene – now a garden centre
Birchwood House. Boarding kennels and cattery

Woldingham Station
Woldingham Station. Dates from 1885 although it was planned since 1833. It was opened as ‘Marden Park’ – at which time it had only a shelter and no facilities. The Line opened in 1884 as the Croydon, Oxted and East Grinstead Railway.
Station Lodge - the station master’s house.
Station Cottage – housing for railway staff
Siding used for a motorised trolley employed on tunnel maintenance.

Saturday, 7 August 2010

Thames Tributary Falcon - Battersea York Road

Thames Tributary Falcon
The Falcon turns north west to reach the Thames at Battersea Creek

This post only covers sites south of the river on this square
TQ 26555 75550

Dense urban area between the river and two main roads running east:west.  The once commercial riverside is now upmarket and fairly garish flats with some waterside bars etc etc etc.  In York Road too commerce has given way to flats and hotels - even Price's famous candle factory is now housing.  The older area around John's Hill still retains some housing and local authority flats although there are flats on the site of St. John's Hospital. Wandsworth Bridge will take you over the river to even more expensive blocks of poky flats.

Post to the west Wandsworth
Post to the east Clapham Junction
Post to the north Battersea Old Town

Bridges Court
Name reflects York Bridge which took York Road over the Falcon Brook. In the 1460s this area included parts of both the manor of Battersea and that of Wandsworth. It was called Bruges and was purchased by the Bishop of Durham, Laurence Booth, later Archbishop of York. He left the area to the See of York.
Bridges Wharf. Atlas Transport and Shipping Co. used to be Prices Candles. Archaeological investigation revealed a series of timber revetments on the bank of Battersea Creek, or Falcon Brook. Pottery and clay tobacco pipe were also found.

Clove Hitch Quay
Molasses House
Calico House
Ivory House
Plantation Wharf
. Built late 1980s

Cotton Row
Falcon - the faintest suggestion of the creek
Price’s Court

Eltringham Street
Eltringham School, currently used as depot for Council's Education Service. This was Secondary boys, Junior Mixed, and Infants.

Falcon
The course of the main stream ran along Ingrave Street, through York Gardens and across York Road. This branch was also known as the York Ditch or York Sewer.


Grant Road
2 Church of the Nazarene. A small circular church built 1968-70 by Green, Lloyd & Son. With a bold lettering and a ramp spiralling around it

Hope Street
Battersea Youth Centre now Battersea Sports Centre. This is soon to close.

Jews Road
Industrial and other features were on the west side

Juniper Drive
Battersea Reach pub
Ascensis Tower
Baltimore House
Commodore House
Kingfisher House
Ensign House


Kambala Road
Kambala is the name of a traditional Indian buffalo race in the mud.
Kambala Estate. Built by the Borough Architect's Department from 1975 onwards, 629 dwellings, disguised.
.
Lavender Road
York Gardens Community Centre and Library
York Gardens Children’s Centre and One O’Clock Club

Livingstone Road Estate
Built 1969-72 with 342 dwellings and an old people's home.

Livingstone Walk,
Leading past small open spaces but enclosed on three sides

Maysoule Road
Local authority housing in Three- storey yellow-brick terraces by Phappen, Randall & Parkes, built in 1976-80.

Mendip Road
Mendip Wharf. Dawson & Co. Builders’ Supplies operating in the 1990s with Broad family members. They can be seen on drain tops on many streets
Mendip Court flats
Sherwood Court

Nantes Close
On site of Spencer Works

Petergate
This was previously John Street
Rainproof cloth works. Moved here in the 19th from east London because of demand from Government departments, mainly to the War Office. The plant could handle 4,000 yards of double width cloth a day on four floors.
Charter or Chater Works used as McCrindle’s Sweet Factory in Up the Junction
Charter House Works. Housing and office development 2003.

Plough Road
Leads from St John's Hill down to the river through a lot of post-Second- World-War council housing. Features in film 'Poor Cow’,
Highview Primary School 1890 Listed Grade II. A London School Board building with a terracotta date plaque. Designed by J Bailey
St.Peter. The church was built in 1875-6 by William White, and a tower added in 1911. . George Cubitt paid for it. In 1970 the church was burnt down on bonfire night but the spire remained. A small building was built and used as a church, and then structural problems meant that the tower had to be demolished. Later the church went into a partnership with St.Mark.
Church Hall and Community Centre murals of New Testament scenes by John Lessore, 1960
Railway crossing – originally there was a level crossing here
Plough Road Institute and Museum plus public bathing facilities it stood on the corner of Benham Close
Railway gas works
Oake Room Gospel Hall

St John’s Hill
St.John's Hospital. Saint John's Hill Workhouse was used by the Wandsworth and Clapham Poor Law Union from 1836. The gaunt older buildings began as the infirmary and casual wards added by Beeston Son & Brereton in 1868. In 1870 an infirmary was also built and from the 1880's when the workhouse moved all the buildings on the St John's site were used as the infirmary. Additions included a nurses' home in 1899. From 1911 it was used for the chronic sick. At the onset of the NHS it was administered by Battersea and Putney Group Hospital Management Committee and the South West Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board with chronic and tubercular patients. In the 1970s Saint John's Day Hospital and Chest Clinic were built on the site. By 1988, it was known as Saint John's Health Care Unit and closed in 1990. Now flats
89 Plough. Demolished and redeveloped. In the middle ages it was the focus of a hamlet called Roydon.
St.Paul's ragstone church of 1868 H. E. Coe. Tower and spire. Now in use as a community centre
126 Cuban Bar. This was previously called One Two Six
197 Beehive pub
92 Centre Academy, school L.C.C. education offices of 1909 T.J. Bailey like a Queen Anne house.
Napier Arms
Surrey Hounds pub. Took a hit from a V1
137-139 Hydro pub. Now flats
St.Peter’s Hospital, Fishmongers Company. Built as almshouses in 1849. It had been established in Newington in 1618. In 1923 it was sold to the LCC who built flats but kept the archway

Strathblane Road
Covers the site of what was Plough Green – this was the focus of a small hamlet called Royden.

Usk Road
St.John’s National Schools. Originally in the 1850s for boys and infants.
St.Johns. Built 1863. The church was brick in a 13th style. In 1938-1939 the parish was amalgamated with St Paul's, which had begun as a chapel of ease for Saint John's

Wandsworth Bridge Gyratory
Roundabout at the southern end of the bridge where four main roads meet. It is an example of 1960s design. It carri++es a large bespoke advertising structure.
Tunnel No. 1. Features in films 'A Clockwork Orange’.

Wandsworth Bridge.
The first bridge here was a toll bridge built by Julian Tolme in 1873 because it was thought a railway station was to be built on the north bank. It was not successful, and became public in 1880, but could not take buses. In 1937 it was demolished, and a steel cantilever bridge by Sir Pierson Frank was built, opened in 1940.

Winstanley Estate
Estate begun by the Met. Borough of Battersea, and finished under Wandsworth London Borough. Designed by Trew Dunn.

Wye Street
Battersea Baptist Church. The building dates from 1973 but goes back to 1672 and a connection with the Sir Walter St. John School.
Thames Christian College in old Library including Hornsby Dyslexic Centre.
Falconbrook Primary School. London School Board type building

Wynter Street
Joseph Tritton Primary School closed and the site is now housing - seven buildings, constructed around landscaped courtyards. Tritton was a supporter of Battersea Baptist Church

York Place
Once known as Silk Factory Lane.
The silk factory failed as the trade declined but in 1840 looms and weaving machinery remained in place.
Fownes took the building over for a glove factory in the 1840s.
Sugar factory here in 1670s owned by John Smith. In 1715 said to be brick built of six storeys. Sugar imported from Barbados.
Distillery, Warehouses, granary and stables as a still house, possibly replacing the sugar works in the 1740s. Included pigs fed on distillery waste and resulting butchery and bacon works. In operation until 1815.
Saccharum Works which belonged to Garton Hill & Co had come here from Southampton in 1882. Garton's Saccharum was a specialist brewing sugar. Taken over by Manbre of Hammersmith from 1926 with Richard Garton as Chair. From then on glucose production concentrated here while cane sugar was processed in Hammersmith. In 1976 they were taken over by Tate & Lyle. 'This was a glucose works with a bad smell locally. Now a trading estate
Homebase on the site of Garton’s Saccharum works,

York Road
York House. Built by Laurence Booth, future Archbishop of York – when he became Archbishop it became part of the See. He had previously bought the Manor of Bruges – known as Bridges. This was then the London residence for the See. It was little used.
Mill - York House grounds – in the 18th century a mill stood in the North East corner on the Falcon Brook. This was associated with the Bell & Bishop distillery.
205 Nags Head
228 Little Bay. Once called the Unity Tavern
327 Builders Arms
499 Alma Tavern
closed and gone,
Battersea Enamel works. In the grounds of York House. This was owned by Steven Theodore Jansen1750s and employed Simon Ravenat. He brought from France a technique for enamelling using copper plates. Bankrupt in 1756 but work was carried on by John Brooks until the 1770s. Belmont Works. Price’s Candle Factory. Opened on the site of the Archbishop of York’s house. It began as Edward Price & Co. in 1830 at Vauxhall. Used West Indian palm oil and claimed to subvert slavery. By the 1870s it covered 13 acres and employed 1,000.They also made soaps and white spirit as electric light undermined the candle trade. Manufacture now takes place abroad and much of the site has been sold for housing. The firm retains a shop on site.
Gargoyle Wharf site of a Shell Oil Terminal. Renamed Battersea Reach
Wandsworth Distillery. Owned by Watney’s but originating in 1817 as Bush & Co.
Orlando Jones Starch manufactory. Opened next to the candle works in 1848. Jones extracted starch from rice using caustic potash of soda. Closed 1901.
S.N.Bridges – Stanley-Bridges electrical tool works
Southampton Wharf. Garton’s Wharf
Thames Water's Falconbrook Pumping Station. Stormwater pumping station.
Travel Lodge
York Gardens Park covering some of the grounds of York house.

Sources
Battersea Baptist Church. Web site
British History on Line. Web site
Church of the Nazarene. Web site
Highview Primary School. Web site.
London Borough of Wandsworth. Web site
Lost Hospitals of London. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
Port of London Magazine

Price's Candles. Web site.
Thames Basin Archaeology of Industry Group. Repor

Thursday, 5 August 2010

Thames Tributary Falcon - Clapham Junction

Thames Tributary Falcon
The Falcon continues northwards but veers west towards the Thames.

TQ27387527

Very busy urban area based around a cross roads and the enormous railway station.  Old Department stores and cinemas, along with churches, modern cinemas, pubs, and a major arts centre and much else.


Post to the west Battersea York Road
Post to the south Wandsworth Common

Aliwal Road
The name commemorates a battle in the first Sikh War of 1846

Altenburg Gardens
1 St.Andrew's United Reform Church. Built as a Presbyterian church in 1886 with wooden shingled spire, which collapsed in 1977. The new building was opened in November 2002.
36 bought by local Catholics for a chapel. St Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church built in 1906-7 on the site of an orchard by Kelly & Dickie. Brick plus a mosaic design over the door.
Reference Library. Designed by the Borough Engineer, T. W.A. Hayward and built by direct labour 1927. Arts and Crafts and designed so an upper floor could be added. It remains One-storied, with a glass-roofed interior.
Bakery Place. Offices.
Telephone exchange.

Amies Street
Paper Mill. On this site before housing was built. Likely to have stood on or near the Heathwall ditch

Andoe Road
Old name for a small cul de sac north of the railway line, adjacent to the bus station
24 Railway Guard pub, long gone.
Station Works

Battersea Rise
Falcon. At Battersea Rise there used to be three ponds and lavender fields
25 The Merchant pub. Previously called Dixie’s
46 Frieda B pub
66a-66b The Goat pub. This was also O’Neills. It was a Temperance Hall which once had 21 billiard tables. It still has its original frontage with a prominent tower. Inside is a mural by a local street artist.
68 The Thomas Memorial Church of the Nazarene. Founded by Welsh businessman David Thomas as the Holiness Mission in 1907. It was an 18th house used as Board of Works Offices before the building of Battersea Town Hall.
85 B@1 pub 91a Adventure pub 110 The Duck Pub. With lots of fancy ironwork and a balcony. It was previously the Dog and Duck.
119 London Ambulance Service. Opened 1962 with three ambulances
145 St.Mark’s Infant School. Listed Grade II. Dated 1866 by Benjamin Ferry in red brick. Paid for by Philip Cazenove and land given by Earl Spencer.
St.Mark's 1872-4 by William White, the first of his Battersea churches. Promoted by Canon Clarke it replaced a previous iron church it is Large and ambitious. It stands on a slope with the end over a large crypt and has a tower covered with shingled timber spire. It is built of concrete, with a brick skin. Listed Grade II*
St.Mark’s church hall.

Batten Street
Christ Church CE Primary School. Founded in 1866 and the present buildings were opened in 1908, but since modernized.

Boutflower Road
Royal Masonic Institution for Girls. 1853 to 1934. instituted in 1788, to maintain the daughters of indigent Freemasons fallen on hard times. It began in 1789 with fifteen pupils and a Matron in Somers Place, East London. In 1934 it moved to Hertfordshire, where it remains. The Battersea building dated from 1852. It was a red brick Gothic structure by Phillip Hardwicke, with a central clock tower. It had 160 pupils.
The Peabody Trust, Clapham Junction Estate, built 1935-37, on the site of the Royal Masonic School. It has 22 five storey blocks of flats
17 Croatian Catholic Mission

Clapham Common North Side
St. Barnabas Church built in the grounds of The Shrubbery in 1897 by architect William Bassett-Smith. Listed: grade 2 it is in the Decorated Gothic style and was probably the last of twenty such churches designed by Smith. . The walls are built of brick, exposed inside, and faced with Kentish rag and Bath stone.

Este Road
Originally called Grove Road. This is part of the site of Pocock’s brickfield from 1852 with large sheds and bricks made – some used in Prince Albert’s model housing.
11 Fire Station.
Falcon Park. Also called Banana Park. A possible branch of the Falcon stream ran through here from Falcon Road to go along the main railway line.
Sacred Heart Primary School
George Shearing Youth Centre

Falcon Road
Previously called Falcon Lane. The east side built up by Pocock whose brickfield was in that area and this was lower middle class housing.
The Falcon – it follows the line of the stream coming from Balham and Tooting flowing to the river Thames at Battersea. It is now covered over. At the bend and junction with Ingrave Street comes off to the west it may be that the Falcon divided– the eastward branch running through what is now Falcon Park, then alongside what is now the main railway line to Victoria, connecting with the Nine Elms Ditch and entering the Thames just beyond Battersea Power Station. This would have made Battersea an island of sorts. The other course ran along Ingrave Street
Timber Yard and saw mills once stood north of the railway bridges.
Falcon Estate. Built by the London County Council. 1959-63. has three six-storey point blocks and some terraces.
75 Battersea Mosque. Modern and purpose built.
81-8 Battersea Labour Club 138 Providence House. Council premises with youth club
148 The Peacock Bar. This was the Meyrick Arms remaining from the Conservative Land Society's development of the area in the 1860s.
156 Electroscope Cinema, in a converted shop
John Fownes’ Glove factory 1777, employed 600 but moved to York Place. Fownes, he lived at Poplar House and the factory and grounds took up most of one side of the lane.
Falcon Lane Goods Depot. North Western Railway. Closed under Beeching.
Coal Depot
Cattle Pens

Fownes Road
Named for local glove factory owner John Fownes

Heathwall Sewer
The Ditch ran along the foot of the slope and drained into the Falcon Brook, making Battersea an island

Heathwall Street
Marks the line of the Heathwall water course.
Glycena Road
43 Battersea Brewery. Founded 2001 to supply beer to pubs in London and the south east by Stephen Nockold. Set up to make beer without chemicals.

Grant Road
Entrance to Clapham Junction Station.

Grayshott Road
The Heathwall stream crossed the area on the line of present day road.
Lavender Gardens
Housing built on the Shrubbery gardens in 1887 as an estate by Heaver designed by architect Charles Bentley
2 The Shrubbery. A Mansion ‘in the grand manner’ built in 1796 mansion predating the development of the area. Home of pre-Raphaelite artist Marie Sparteli. Used as a school by Canon Clarke1885, then as a parish hall, then left derelict. It was restored and converted to flats in 1987. It is stuccoed with five bays and a big curved porch.
33 Home of author G.A.Henty. Plaque erected 1953 which says 'author, lived here'. He was here from 1894 until his death and wrote stories about colonial military history, from his career as war correspondent of "The Standard".
49-51 Jongleurs Comedy Club and Bar Risa. Have had lots of names including Cornet of Horse and Stanley’s Masonic Halls

Lavender Hill
Line of the Old Portsmouth Road, described also as the road to Kingston – it is the east west high road through the area. . The heart of Victorian and Edwardian Battersea. Housing in surrounding roads developed in the late 19th by Heaver and included were 31 shops here designed by Thomas of Gunnersbury.
Named from the lavender cultivated in the market gardens which once lay to the north of this road in Battersea Fields. This was an 1820 nursery owned by William Pamplin growing for perfume makers.
171 Lavender Restaurant and Bar
204 Asda 1980s. On the site of the bombed Pavilion Cinema and shops
Pavilion Chambers and Lavenham Court, replacement shops built in 1963 for shops lost in V1 attack of1944.
Pavilion Cinema. Opened in 1916 and destroyed by a V1 in 1944 killing 28. Also called Kinestra. A Crompton Organ was installed in 1926
265 Central Library. 1888-90 by Paul Mountford, built of red brick Jacobean trimmings. at the back is the Reference Library. There is a weather vane in the design of a book reader
311 At one time this was the Electro Theatre de Luxe 230 tip-up seats, an 11 feet by 8 feet picture. Prices 3d and 6d. Closed and gone. Also called The Gem.
Arding & Hobbs. Henry Arding and Mr. Hobbs had had a store in Wandsworth in 1876. This large department store was opened in 1885 on a site bought from Tom Taylor. Hobbs retired in 1905. There is a corner cupola at the corner of St John's Hill, and large display windows at first-floor level. Designed in 1910 by James Gibson, following a fire in 1909 which killed 8, on the lines of central London stores. The rebuilding was the result of a fire in 1909. Now part of Debenhams. Electric House. In 1927 this was offices for the Borough Electricity Dept and also included the Borough Health Dept.
Old Town Hall, Battersea Arts Centre. Puppet Centre Trust. Built 1892-3 as Battersea Town Hall and designed by Edward Mountford in a limited competition in 1891. It has a symmetrical front of red brick with a semicircular porch and pediments with carved reliefs by Paul Mountford celebrating municipal Battersea - Labour and Progress, Art and Literature, instruct the youthful figure of Battersea. At the back is a large hall with an octagonal glass domed lobby the entrance hall had a mosaic of industrious bees. A Sculpture, on the staircase is Eurydice by W. Calder Marshall, 1893. It was closed in 1965 but a public campaign led to it being used as a community building until 1979 and in 1981 it became an independent arts centre, with a theatre space in the former council chamber. Behind is a large public hall seating 1,140
176 Police station and South Western magistrates’ court built 1892 and rebuilt in 1963.

Lavender Sweep
Built by Heaver on the Dives Estate. Dives had a flour mill in Church Road

Latchmere Road
Called Pig Hill until the mid-20th
Latchmere Road School. Opened 1883 and designed by London School Board architect Robson. Now flats.
66 Fox and Hounds

Northcote Road
31-37 Bank Pub
8-10 Iniquity pub

15-17 Cinema opened as The Bio Picture Palace in 1908, converted from a former assembly room, Bolingbroke Hall. It changed to The Standard Electric Theatre in 1912, then The Bolingbroke Picture Hall, and then the Globe Electric Theatre. It was renamed the Century in 1951 and closed in 1964. Demolished for a supermarket. The Globe, and lastly The Century

Spencer Road
11 Walled garden with a vine-covered pergola, and a formal bed of yew and holly.

St.John's Hill
St John's Hill has the family name of the Viscounts Bolingbroke, lords of the manor of Battersea.
4 Slug and Lettuce
21-25 The Grand Opened by Dan Leno as the new Grand Palace of Varieties in 1900 the architect was E.A.Woodrow. The name changed to the Grand in 1946, and then to Essoldo by 1950. It closed in 1963 and reopened as a Bingo Hall which lasted until the late 1980s, and it is now a music venue. A gaunt facade with two towers with arcading. The auditorium still has boxes with pagoda canopies and plaster fronts with Chinese dragons. A false ceiling obscures the upper balcony and shallow dome.
27 Drill Hall. Head Quarters East Surrey Voluntary Regiment – with a variety of names and manifestations.
36 Windsor Castle Half timbered pub
43 Project Orange pub
54-46 Station Master’s House. Pre 1838 with a wide courtyard.
58 Granada Cinema which showed the premier of ‘Up the Junction' in 1968, split to three screens 1973. A bingo club since 1980, it was closed in 1997 to exclude it from the sale of the Gala chain to a management buyout. It is listed Grade II. Originally seating 2475, it has a 1930s exterior with a rounded corner entrance. It was fully equipped for stage use with many dressing rooms, and ran both cinema and variety for many years. After the Second World War, it hosted annual pantomimes as well as circus, ballet, variety and Annie Get Your Gun. One of Komisarjevsky's finest achievements. Now Lumiere apartments
Battersea Grammar School, previously on the site of the cinema. Founded 1875 as an offshoot of Walter St.John's School
Falcon Hotel, built 1887, with engraved glass and a window showing the present building and its predecessors. It is said it gave its name to the Falcon Brook. It was itself so called from the crest of the St.John family, lords of the manor of Battersea - a rising falcon.
St.John’s Hill Centre for the Elderly. Adjacent to the Peabody estate.
The Imperial Picture Theatre. Opened in 1890 as Munt’s Variety Hall becoming the Grand Hall of Varieties in 1894. It became a cinema in 1914 and then Renamed simply as "Imperial" in 1955. It closed in 1973, then re-opened as The Ruby - named after the manager's wife. IN 1981 it closed suddenly and was demolished. The site is now a bank.
Clapham Junction Station. 2nd March 1863. Between Earlsfield and Wandsworth Town and Queenstown Road on South West Rail. Terminus of West London Line from West Brompton. Between Wandsworth Common and West Brompton on Southern Rail. The north west bit is owned by London & South West Railway, the south east bit by the West London Extension Railway, the rest was London Brighton and South Coast Railway. In 1834-8 the first line was built - the London and Southampton, by Joseph Locke, in succession to Francis Giles, running to a terminus originally at Nine Elms, and from 1848 to Waterloo. The L.S.W.R. line from Clapham Junction ran via Barnes to Richmond and later Windsor, 1846 by Locke. Via Balham and Clapham Junction. It was a very early station, built for the London and Southampton line in 1838. In 1853 the western leg of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway was added, originally the independent West End and Crystal Palace Railway. This runs alongside the L.S.W.R., and across the river by Grosvenor Bridge to Victoria, the last stretch built as the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway, 1859-60 by John Fowler. In 1859-63 the West London Extension Railway was added. This is by William Baker, crosses the river to Kensington and the main lines to the west and north. In 1860 Converging on the same bridge as the London and Brighton, via Brixton, is the West-End leg of the London Chatham and Dover Railway, by Joseph Cubitt. This was realigned through Battersea on a high-level line in 1866-7. In 1867 Alongside the L.C.D.R. the Brighton Company's South London line via Brixton to London Bridge, was added, again on the high level, to which their line via Clapham Junction was also raised. In the rush hours, the railway lines are the busiest in the world. They run on stock- brick viaducts, with the earlier low-level lines serving railway yards with a complicated history. It has 16 active platforms with upwards of 2,000 trains passing through daily. There are two distinct and independent sides to the station. The Central Division of Southern Region has the lines from Victoria to Surrey and Sussex (platforms 12-17) and South Western Division the lines from Waterloo to the south west suburbs and Portsmouth, Weymouth, Exeter, etc., plus the 'Windsor' lines. The layout is controlled by three signal boxes, 'B' (Central Division) and 'A' & 'C' (S.W. Division).
A Signal Box of 1911 as part of the London & South Western Railway's scheme to introduce pneumatically powered semaphore signalling to its main routes. The box is mounted on a gantry spanning the South Western Division tracks at the London end. The framework for a wartime protective steel plate roof remains. It remained in service until the area was resignalled with colour lights in 1956
C_Signal Box. This box which is situated at the end of platforms 5 and 4. A typical LSWR type box of the early part of the 20th it was probably opened at the same time as 'A' Box. The base is brick while the upper storey is of timber and glass.
B Box. The most recent of the three signal boxes at Clapham Junction, being opened in 1952 in connection with the introduction of colour light signaling to the London end of the Brighton Line. It is responsible for all movements on the Central Division side with flanking signal boxes. It is situated at the east end of the station and, typically for the period, is constructed of concrete and brick
Parcels office of 1910, restored

Theatre Street
Named because it was adjoining the old Shakespeare Theatre

Town Hall Road
Named because it was next to the Town Hall

Sources
Arding and Hobbs. Web site
Battersea Mosque. Web site
Blue Plaque Guide
Battersea  Arts Centre. Web site
Christ Church School. Web site
Church of the Nazarene. Web site
Cinema Theatres Association. Newsletter
Cinema Treasures. Web site
Clapham Junction. Wikipdia. Web site
Drill Halls. Web site
Falcon Hotel. Web site
Field. London Place Names
Goat. Web site
Jonglers. Web site
London Railway Record
Lucas. London
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
St. Andrews., URC Web site
St.Barnabas. Web site
St. Mark's Web site
St. Vincent de Paul. Web site
The Merchant. Web site
Wandsworth Council. Web site

Sunday, 1 August 2010

Thames Tributary Falcon - Wandsworth Common

Thames Tributary Falcon
The Falcon ran north and west towards the Thames


Post to the north Clapham Junction
Post to the south Wandsworth Common

Auckland Road
The Invitation pub. Closed

Battersea Rise
Battersea Rise is recorded as this in 1718, and is named from a field called ‘the Ryse’ in 1605. This might be from the Old English for 'brushwood' referring to local plant growth or from the 'rising or sloping ground'.
Wandsworth Station Opened 1st May 1838. Built by the London and Southampton Railway as their first station out of London, it was built on the side of what is now Battersea Rise as the line had curved to avoid the high ground at Clapham Common. Although named ‘Wandsworth’ it was a long way from there and eight years later it was renamed ‘Clapham Common’ - an area only marginally nearer than Wandsworth. Less than twenty years later it was closed.
New Wandsworth Station. Opened on 29th March 1858 by the West End of London and Crystal Palace Railway. Ire was on the south side of Battersea Rise opposite Clapham Common Station and closed in 1869.
New Wandsworth Goods Station. This is shown on maps of the 1890s alongside Chivalry Road plus a coal depot. It was on an elevated area above the main line and was still extant in the 1950s. It is now the site of Arundel Close
Battersea, St.Mary's, Cemetery. Owned by the London Borough of Wandsworth. The cemetery was opened in 1860 and was exhausted in the 1960's. There is a Gothic chapel and lodge plus a variety of memorials and trees. Graves include lots of railway deaths and John Burns, MP.
Emanuel School is a co-educational independent school founded by Lady Dacre and Elizabeth I in 1594. It is one of three schools administered by the United Westminster Schools’ Foundation. With Lady Dacre's benefaction in 1594, Emanuel Hospital was opened and thanks to Elizabeth I, her cousin, the school and almshouses were established at Tothill Fields. In 1883, the school and its boy moved into the current building which had been a boys' orphanage and part of the Royal Patriotic Orphanage. It had been designed by Henry Saxon Snell 1871 in high Victorian style with .lots of stained glass. There is a lodge at the Battersea Rise entrance,

Berber Road
The name alludes to Gordon's expedition of 1884

Bolingbroke Grove
This was called Five Houses Lane when five houses were built along the edge of the common in the late 18th by the landowning Spencer family. The area between Wandsworth and Clapham Common was developed from the 1860s and the road was named for the family of the Viscounts Bolingbroke, lords of the manor of Battersea.
Bolingbroke House. One of the original five houses built in the 1830s. Was purchased for a hospital in 1876 as the Bolingbroke Self Supporting Hospital and House in Sickness. Demolished 1937.
104 South West London Synagogue, opened 1920 closed 2000. Now housing
26 Northcote Lodge on the site of Linden School. Independent boys’ preparatory school.
26 Linden Lodge school for the Indigent Blind School. George Shearing, Jazz pianist, trained there. It is believed to have been designed by London School Board Architect E.R.Robson. The school itself is now in other premises in the Borough.

Broomwood Road
Built on the site of Broomfield House, one of William Wilberforce’s homes. Demolished 1904
111 Plaque to Wilberforce
Thomas Clapham in the old County Grammar School for Girls. Thomas school is a private school founded by a Mrs.Thomas. Built 1904 and listed Grade II. In 1978 it became 'Walsingham School', which changed in 1993 to 'Thomas' Preparatory School'

Chatham Road
Originally this was called Bolingbroke Grove

Cobham Close
Wandsworth estate of the 1970s.
St.Michael. Grade IIl listed church and community centre. Designed by William White in 1881.

Honeywell Road
Smaller terraces, with characteristically elaborate brickwork and barge boarded gables.
Honeywell Junior School

Mallinson Road
Ransom Pentecostal African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. Chapel and Sunday School. This was the Methodist Church and School, built 1878, architect James Speed,

Montholme road
Route of the Falcon Brook

Northcote Road
Route of the Falcon Brook which forms a valley in which the road lies. The road has in the past been part of a major flood.Library. Opened in two shops in 1948 and subsequently rebuilt.
LCC Fire Station built 1906, closed 1914b and demolishedb1970.
Baptist Church. Built 1887-9 by E. W. Mountford. It has a tower on the corner.
Cinema in an old assembly room. Initially in 1908 it was the Bio Picture Palace, renamed the Globe, then the Century and closed in 1960s to become a supermarket.
174 Bolingbroke Pub
59 The Holy Drinker pub
94 Pitcher and Piano Pub

Rushham Road
Route of the Falcon Brook
Shelgate Road
61 plaque to Edward Thomas which says 'essayist and poet lived here'.

Wakehurst Road
The Bolingbroke Hospital. Built in stages between 1901 and 1936 on the site of Bolingbroke House, in which it was originally housed. Closed 2008 Central tower with beneath it a plaque about the opening of the Shepherd Wing in 1927. Below the cornice are the words ‘Bolingbroke Hospital’ which commemorates its founding by Canon Erskine Clarke in 1880. There are also ward blocks, out patients (The Victoria Memorial Wing) and an early ex-ray suite. Inside Edwardian fitting survive. The Children’s Ward includes tiles of nursery rhymes and tropical scenes. Another set of tiles by Carter of Pool show animals. In the vestibule there is a war memorial, the lifts have original fittings and there is also a Board Room. Most of the work undertaken throughout by the practice of Young and Hall.

Wandsworth Common
A flattish common of mowed grassland with the usual standard trees. The Spencer family as lords of the manor allowed extensive gravel extraction and by 1877 the Metropolitan Board of Works managed it.