Monday, 21 March 2011

Thames Tributary Carters Brook - Noak Hill

Thames Tributary Carters Brook
The Brook flows south towards the River Ingrebourne and the Thames


Post to the west Noak Hill
Post to the north Havering Plain 
Post to the east Weald Side
Post to the south Harold Hill

Chequers Road
The Forge, architectural ironwork


Church Lane
Hill Farm. The Long House.
St.Thomas. Built as a chapel of ease in 1842 by the London architect George Smith, as a memorial to for Lady Frances Neave of Dagnams. It is a small building of red brick with a tower was restored in 1971. Inside is an 18th chamber organ from Dagnams and a collection of old glass
Churchyard, monuments to the Neaves, including a Grecian pedestal to Charlotte Mary Neave, with a mourning woman.
School House Community Centre. This was St. Thomas's Church of England school built in 1848 by subscription and government grant for 96 children. In 1936 it became a school for mixed juniors and infants. It has since closed and was used as a restaurant for a while.
Open space with hall. Sports and views.

Dagnam Park
Richard Neave bought Dagnam Park Estate in 1781. He was a director of Hudson’s Bay Company and a West India Merchant, Governor of the Bank of England and High Sheriff of Essex. He enclosed the area in 1814. The park and gardens had been laid out in the late 17th but 1812 the landscape gardener Humphrey Repton, who lived at Hare Street, redesigned the layout
Dagnams. There was an earlier house on a slightly different site. It was rebuilt by Richard Neave and the family lived there until after the Second World War and it was demolished in 1950.
The wall that surrounded the garden exists below ground level and they were demolished in 1959. A mulberry tree from the house survives here.
Pond still exists and was a bathing pool and there is a step down into the pool. There is also a stone dog
Moat.

Lower Noak Close
Dagnam Priory this was a red brick mansion. Taken over by the London County Council and demolished in 1956. Its origins are obscure but it was probably mid 19th. It stood in 40 acres of woodland with specimen trees.
Pond – the pond associated with the house remains.

Noak Hill.
The name was recorded, with this spelling, in 1490 but later as ‘Nook’ or ‘‘Note...

Noak Hill Road
Rose Cottage. Timber-framed and weather boarded
Thatched Cottage timber-framed and weather boarded
Old Keeper's Cottage timber-framed and weather boarded
Orchard Cottages, c18 two pairs, both brick
Meadow Cottages, c19, two pairs, both brick
Holly Tree Cottage, timber-framed and tarred weatherboarding, late c18.,
Manor Farm. Complex of 19th buildings

Sources
Osborne. Defending London

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