Saturday, 2 April 2011

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Elm Park

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne
The Ingrebourne flows south west


Area to the edge of Hornchurch with several schools

Post to the east Hacton
Post to the north Hornchurch
Post to the south Hornchurch

Bonington Road
Scotts Primary School

Maybank Avenue
Pillbox from the Second World War, adjacent to Scotts School

Suttons Lane
In the middle ages this was called Lake Street
The Sanders Drapers School. When Suttons School was opened in 1938, it was only yards from Hornchurch Aerodrome. The school had separate buildings for boys and girls and the Boys' School overlooked the aerodrome, boys watched aircraft instead of learning. In 1943a spitfire piloted by Flying Officer Raimond Sanders Draper, an American developed engine trouble on take-off. Realising he could hit the school, he put the nose of the Spitfire down in the playing field, and it came to rest against the wall of the two end classrooms and Sanders Draper was dead in his cockpit. A plaque marks the spot of the crash and the school has since been renamed for him. It is now a specialist science college the boys and girls departments having been merged and the school enlarged.
Suttons Primary School. Opened in 1933 in temporary buildings and closed in 1940. In 1947 it was reopened in buildings which had once been part of Suttons Institution.
St. George’s Hospital. Built by John Stuart, Essex County Council architect in 1939 as an old people's home called Suttons Institution. It replaced an older institution. In the Second World War it was used for airmen from R.A.F. Hornchurch. In 1948 it was taken over by the NHS and used for geriatric cases. It includes the Ingrebourne Centre for psychiatric patients.

Sources
Defence of Britain. Web site
London Borough of Redbridge. Web site
Lost Hospitals of London, Web site
Sanders Drapers School. Web site
Scotts School. Web site
Suttons Primary School. Web site
Victoria History of Essex

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