Wednesday, 8 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - tributary stream - Shelley

Thames Tributary River Roding
A tributary stream flows south to the Roding


TL 55 06
Post to the north- Fyfield - 55 07
Post to the west - Shelley Common - 54 06
Post to the east - Herons Farm - 56-06
Post to the south - Ongar - 55 05

Church Lane
Shelley is an old manor mentioned in Domesday.
St.Peter. Built in 1888 by Habershon and Fawkner. The medieval parish church was in ruins and unsafe by 1800. The current church is the third on the site and built from money raised by subscriptions. It is in of Red brick with some flint. Inside is a painting "The Madonna di Foligno" and monuments to the Greene family who lived here from the late 16th to the 18th.
Shelley Hall. This was originally an early l4th hall house which was timber framed with gault brick cladding. Inside is the original heavily sooted l4th roof structure. It was altered and enlarged, by John Greene – this is dated as 1587 on lintel – he had a large family. In the roof is a room with 8 painted panels - one shows a cock and there are also some flowers. Also inside are a 16th carved oak chimney piece, an 18th staircase, doors, and some original shutters.
Cart lodge with Dovecote. This is 18th timber framed and weather boarded. At the top is a weather boarded 3 hole dovecote with a nesting area

Ongar Road
Bundish is a manorial name probably named for the family of John de Burndish who was connected to Moreton manor in the 14th. It was described as a manor in the 1770s but later as a farm. The house itself is in the parish of Moreton with the parish boundary runs along the west wall of the house, so the outbuildings are in Shelley. This is a moated site – the moat has been recently renovated and allegedly the ‘bung’ found. It has all now been done up for new housing.
Bundish Hall. 15th house with later alterations. This was a medieval manor house and includes the late-15th solar wing. It is Part timber framed part brick and plastered. In the early 19th it was the house was reduced in size, and partly cased in brick so it appears to be a small 19th farm-house. There was some Second World War bomb damage,
Barn at Bundish Hall. 16th Timber framed and weather boarded barn. Now done up for housing. Cart lodge at Bundish Hall Farm. 18th Timber framed and weather boarded and now also done up for housing.
Granary at Bundish Hall Farm. 18th Timber framed and weather boarded. Housing too.
Folyats. House built 1914 by J. W. Newall with a view over the Forest Hall, which is what he wanted

No comments: