Sunday, 18 December 2011

Nazeing Brook - Nazeing House

Nazeing Brook
Nazeing Brook flows west and north west towards the River Lee

Post to the north Betts Lane
Post to the west Bumbles Green
Post to the east Nazeingwood Common

Back Lane
The name may refer to the Saxon word for a ridge, and reflect the higher ground on which Nazeing stands.
Ravens. a timber-framed weather-boarded building of the  18th. Inside are four 19th paintings on door panels.
Queens Cottages
Sewage Works, marked on map but not apparent
Kingswood Chase. 16th timber framed and plastered house. The occupants have rights on Nazeingwood Common.
Red House. 18th in red brick. The occupants have rights on Nazeingwood Common.

Belchers Lane
This was once known as Brewery Lane
Belchers Farm.  Farmhouse – 16th timber framed and plastered
Nazeing Golf Club. Clubhouse. Likely to close.
Teys Farmhouse. 18th timber framed and weather boarded

Nazeing Common Road
Nazeing Park. The estate was built up in the late 18th by William Palmer, and he accumulated parcels of land over time. In 1800 he built a large house, called Nazeing House later Nazeing Park.  His son George made further additions to the estate and the estate remained in the family until shortly 1936. After the Second World War the house and grounds passed to Essex County Council, and in 1952 it became  Nazeing Park Special School. Stable block 19th in yellow brick and a clock in the centre of the gable and a dome for a bell turret it is now used as an art gallery.  A well has now been dog and there are plans to recommission a 19th water tower. A walled garden provides produce for Nazeing Park, and there are chicken coops, greenhouses, etc. Attached to the stable block is stable cottage. Coach House of yellow brick plus garages and a flag above. Nazeing Brook flows through the grounds and has been dammed to form a lake. There is a boathouse, and a lakeside gazebo and a clay pigeon tower
King Harold’s Head Pub. Robert King built the pub with a brew house in 1797. He also founded King's Brewery, Nazeing. It is named for King Harold who is buried in Waltham Abbey.
Nazeing Gate – the entrance to the Nazingwood Common area as a forest park for Waltham Abbey. This was originally to the south west.
Poor House. This was slightly south of the Back Lane junction. Demolished

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