Sunday, 31 July 2011

Thames Tributary - tributary to the river Roding - Theydon Mount

Thames Tributary - tributary to the river Roding
The tributary flows south west


Post to the west Hobbs Cross Farm
Post to the north Mount End
Post to the east Theydon Mount
Post to the south Abridge Golf Course

Peaks Farm

Private Road
Route of Roman Road

Theydon Mount

Hill Hall house. It replaced an earlier house, occupied since the 12th century, on the same site. Built 1569-75 for Sir Thomas Smith, probably to his own design, with Richard Kirby. Major alterations in the early 20th by Reginald Blomfield for Charles Hunter. Became a prison 1952 and was gutted by fire 1969. It is brick with rendered terracotta. Inside are Tudor wall-paintings and other decorative features. The house is a landmark in the use of Renaissance ideas in England and it is quite exceptional. Now converted to housing.
Gardens altered by Humphrey Repton 1791 and altered in the 20h by Philip Tilden for Sir Robert and Lady Hudson. Includes a ‘Wilderness’ and old parkland with veteran trees, including ancient pollarded oaks, known to support characteristic fauna, including bat roosts
Bathing pavilion by Philip Tilden 1927 Circular with a domed roof. It is at the end of the bathing pool
Hut - Red brick, hexagonal building from the 19th, this is near the pavilion and the pool
Stable block
Avenue of trees leading up to the house.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Hobbs Cross

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The flows eastwards and is joined by two tributaries from the north


47 01
Post to the north Coopersale Street 47 02
Post to the east Mount End 48 01
Post to the west Flux's Lane
Post to the south Hobbs Cross


Hobbs Cross Road
Hobbs Cross Golf Centre. Opened in 1997
Fiddlers Hamlet Sewage Treatment Works
M11

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Mount End

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area from two branches and flows south west
A tributary flows south west


Post to the north Gaynes Park
Post to the east Beachet Wood
Post to the south Theydon Mount
Post to the west Hobbs Cross Road


Brick Kiln Hill
Brick and tile works site

Mount End
Sawkins Farm. Barn. 17th Timber fr
amed and weather boarded. The farmhouse is 16th with some 14th remains.

Mount Road
North Farm. 18th farmhouse. ‘1789’ is written on the chimney
Telephone box. Type K6. Designed 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.
Hornes Farm with a series of large outbuildings
Searles Hall, 19th red brick farm house. 16th barn
Mount Hill Farm

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Gaynes Park

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows southwards


48 02
Post to the west Coopersale Street
Post to the south Mount End

Gaynes Park
Gaynes Park, a 19th mansion. Red brick faced with Grey stone. Above are rails and four gargoyles. Acquired by the Chisenhale-Marsh family in 1792, who altered it, in grey brick before 1818. Now converted into flats
Gardens
Barns – red brick 29th outbuildings around a courtyard. One range had a
clock tower and clock. Behind them is an old forge and another red brick outbuilding, and then a brick weather boarded barn. There are other red brick buildings and also a 19th open Barn with weatherboard cladding and terracotta effigies of a Dragon and a Griffon. This is now called The Orangery, The Gather Barn, The Mill Barn and the Apple Loft Honeymoon Cottage and used as a ‘wedding venue’
Site of the ancient manor house of Gaynes Park Hall, also spelt Gaines and also called Park Hall. Elizabeth visited and held a Council here when it was owned by William Fitzwilliam and later by the Earls of Anglesey. Demolished 1740.

Mount Quarter
Wild life site

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Coopersale Street

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows southwards

TL 47386 01762

Village area and isolated pub

Post to the north Coopersale Common
Post to the east Gaynes Park
Post to the south Hobbs Cross Road 

Coopersale Street
9 Theydon Oak Pub. 18th building including a detached coach house
26 A large timber-framed house formerly a farm, probably 16th. 17th- brew house addition. The annexe became the post-office. 16th barn. Timber framed and weather boarded
Forge Cottage Coopersale Lodge. 15th house timber-framed and plastered hall house
Houses said to once have been two almshouses
South Lodge. At the entrance to Gaynes Park. 16th Cottage. Timber framed and weather boarded. The porch has ‘rustic supports’
Yeomans, once called Dover Court, made up of 16th cottages 2-8. Weather boarded.
School. In 1850 Miss Archer-Houblon, of Coopersale House funded this church school and later funded an extension. It was replaced in the early 1970s and is now housing.
Home Farm. Granary from the 19th Timber-framed and weather boarded on red brick steddle stones. Barn from the 16th Timber framed and weather boarded. Its frame has been described as ‘very interesting’ in its style of carpentry which is said to relate to east Sussex. The building on the west side of the courtyard is 16th timber-framed and clad in black weatherboarding. It is said to be in a mid-Essex style of carpentry in contrast to the South West Essex style of the main barn. Partly now converted to housing

Fiddlers Hamlet
The name Fiddlers Hamlet is late but the 'Merry Fiddlers' was already the focus of settlement in the 17th century.

M11

Stewards Green Road
Merry Fiddlers. The inn itself probably incorporates part of a 17th building

Sources
British History on line. Essex
British Listed Buildings, Web site
Merry Fiddlers. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry, Essex
Theydon Oak. Web site

Saturday, 30 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Coopersale Common

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows southwards

TL 47630 02973

Village area with all the usual villagey things

Post to the south Coopersale Street

Brickfield Road
Site of Styles brickfield in the 19th
Coopersale and Theydon Garnon Church of England Primary School. This was Theydon Garnon School founded in 1850 by the Church of England. In September 1970 it moved to Coopersale
Coopersale Cricket Club on the Brickfield site

Coopersale Common
Garnon Bushes pub. Was once called the Rose and Crown and appears to have once been a row of cottages
Anson’s farm

Gernon Bushes
Nature reserve with hornbeam pollards plus recent woodland and a network of ponds dug for gravel extraction. There are two springs and their streams travel down steep valleys with a series of bogs

Houblons Hill
St. Alban’s church, 1852. Overlooks the Roding valley. Very plain but includes some items of local interest.
War memorial in the churchyard erected 1919
Lynch gate. This was erected in 1907 made of local oak.
Coopersale farm
Little Ark Nursery in the parish rooms.
Coopersale House, 17th and 18th mansion. Formerly owned by the Archer-Houblon family who inherited it in the mid 18th but from the late 19th it remained unoccupied and was bought in 1914 by a religious order. It has since returned to residential use.
Vicarage. 1852 in Polychrome brick. There is a two storey gabled with gothic arched doors

Institute Road
Part of the Institute Road Estate was built in 1926,
Village Institute, donated by Mr. H. E. J. Camps of Coopershale house And built in 1926

Parklands Estate
Site of the cottage homes. They were built in 1912 as part of the union workhouse of Theydon Garnon caring for about 40 orphan children

Sources
Children's Homes. Web site
Coopersale and Theydon Garnon School. Web site
Coopersale  Cricket Club. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Garnon Bushes, Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
St.Albans Church. Web site

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Flux's Lane

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards


46 01
Post to the west Great Gregories
Post to the east Hobbs Cross Road
Post to the south Blunts Farm
 Brook Road

The tributary stream runs parallel and south of the road.

Flux’s Lane
Named after a 19th owner of Coopersale Hall.
Coopersale Hall. The present house is 18th and it was painted by Pissaro in the 1890s. It was later owned by Lyle of Tate and Lyle who was also a local MP. In the Second World War it was an officers’ convalescent home. It has since become yet another private school “prep” school, this one founded in 1989 and owned by the Haggar family.
1st Theydon Garnon Scout Hut. Brookfield. This is an ex army hut bought in the 1960s in an auction and erected here by parents
Gardners Farm
Epping Golf Club, founded in the 1950s by Charles Sjoberg

Little Thornhall. Farm on the site of a medieval manor house.

M25
Junction 27 with M11 Junction 6. This section of the M11 was built in 1977. The M25 between 1979 and 1982

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Great Gregories

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards


45 01
Post to the west Great Monk Wood 44 01
Post to the east Flux's Lane 46 01
Post to the south Theydon Bois


Bridge Hill

Leading to the railway bridge currently used by the Central Line

Golf Course
Fullers Plain
Purlieu Bank. At the eastern edge of the golf course are some remains of the 13th Purlieu Bank, a hedge and ditch, which provided the boundary of the old royal forest.

Great Gregories Lane
The manor of Gregories is probably named from a Gregory who was a verderer here in 1250
Great Gregories farm. This was here in 1848 but the farm-house is 20th. Native trees plated to screen the M25. The Purlieu Bank runs along the western side of the farm. The farm was used by the City Corporation to store stonework awaiting restoration.
Moat which probably represents the site of the medieval manor house of Gregories.
A field at the end of the lane known in 1848 as 'Gregory's Garden'.

Ivy Chimneys Road
Spotted Dog pub. Closed 2010

Little Gregories Lane
The Purlieu Bank may have gone down here leading to Purlieu Farm
Little Gregories. 19th redbrick building
Riding School and livery stables

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Great Monk Wood

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards


44 01
Post to the west Ambresbury Banks 43 01
Post to the east Great Gregories 45 01
Post to the north Epping Bell Common

Epping Road
Park Cottage
Yew Tree Cottage

Epping Forest
Tank trap forming a bank with ditch. Part of defensive ring built for the Second World War
Great Monk Wood covers the high ground between the Wake valley and one to the east. In the 13th it belonged to Stratford Langthorne Abbey and part to Waltham Abbey and there was some conflict between the two when timber was cut. Lopping rights were not practised in Monks Wood and pollarding, was done by the Lord of the Manor until 1842. Some beeches in the wood are old and diseased and some ‘maiden’ beech pollards thus being created.

Forest Side
Mulberry Cottage. 19th house with smooth render & decorative features
Brackley. 19th house with smooth render & decorative features
Ridge House 19th house with smooth render & decorative features

Green Ride
The Green Ride was cut through the Forest in preparation for its official dedication by Queen Victoria in 1882.

Theydon Road
Club house for Theydon Bois golf course. The course dates to the late 19th.
Theydon Towers. Big house built in the 1880s and used a military hospital during the First World War. Then the South West Ham Committee (part of the Charity Organisation Society) gave this yellow brick 19th century house - to Queen Mary's Hospital for the East End as a children's convalescent home. Closed in 1927 because of funding difficulties and the house was sold. It may then have become the Loreto Convent eventually a home for unmarried pregnant women. The site has since been redeveloped and converted into housing
Cottage became a Home of Rest for the nurses of the Hospital
Bowden’s Meadow. Red brick 19th house

Friday, 29 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding - Ambresbury Banks

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows eastwards towards the Roding.


This post covers a swathe of Epping Forest bisected by Epping Road - once the major A11.  The massive earthwork is on the eastern side while towards the west are woods and features connected to Copped Hall - the big house in a square to the east and on the other side of the M25

43 01
Post to the east Great Monk Wood 44 01
Post to the north Copped Hall Estate
Post to the west Crown Hill



Epping Forest
The name Epping Forest is on record from 1662 and it is the remains of the Forest of Waltham - land over which the Crown had hunting rights. In 1882 Corporation of London acquired the forest for the citizens of London
Ambresbury banks. This is a large earthwork covering 12 acres standing at one of the highest points of the forest. This ancient fortification with ramparts originally 10 feet high, is held by tradition to have been the scene of Queen Boadicea's last stand against Suetonius, although there is no evidence whatsoever for this. It is an Iron Age hill fort thought to date from around 700 BC. It has been the subject of archaeological examination a number of times starting with Pitt-Rivers in 1881. The area within and around it is completely wooded although this would not have been the case when it was in use and the tributary stream rises within it.

Epping Road
Coal duty post. On the east side by Ambresbury Banks and 800 yards south of the Bell Common Tunnel.

Lodge Road
This appears to be only the road from the Epping Road to Copped Hall – and is now bisected by the M25. It floods with overflow from adjacent ponds. The road forms a dam between two boggy valleys and carbon dating analysis of the bottom layers on the road date it to the early Bronze Age. Pollen analysis also shows a dominance of lime trees at a time when lime had died out in other parts of Britain – and comes to a sudden end as agriculture grew in the area around 1000 years ago. It is now a scenic 19th driveway owned by the City of London
The Warren. This arboretum was once part of Copped Hall Park and was acquired by The Corporation of London in 1992, as part of a purchase of 800 acres of Copped Hall estate. It was part of the pleasure grounds and includes 50 species of trees and rhododendrons. South of the M25 is now known as Holly Hedge Field and there are clumps of trees. The field was re-landscaped by spoil from the excavations for the M25 in the early 1980’s.
Entrance Lodges to the Copped Hall Estate. They are London Lodge East and London Lodge West – which with the entrance gates, are listed buildings. They date from 1775 when Copped Hall was redesigned by James Wyatt. They are designed as three-dimensional objects

Sources
Betts. London City and the People. 
Corporation of the City of London. Web site
Essex Journal
London Transport. Country Walks
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Walford Village 1

Thames Tributary River Roding -Lambourne

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow west in a convoluted route. It is joined by a tributary from the south


Post to the west Ongar Road
Post to the south Church Lane
Post to the east Stapleford Aerodrome
Post to the north Abridge Golf Course

Ongar Road
Jennikings Nursery
Pryors, Barn
, 17th, Timber framed and weatherboarded

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows northwards to the Roding


Post to the west Lambourne
Post to the north Ongar Road
Post to the east Stapleford Abbotts
Post to the south Lambourne End

Church Lane
Great Wood. This is also joined by Mutton Corner and together they form the largest block of woodland on the old Lambourne Hall Estate. The stream runs through both woods. There is hornbeam coppice on the north-western edge while the remainder is oak and ash with hazel coppice. The age of the wood can be understood from the Bank and ditch earthworks around the boundary. There are also several ponds and a ride system.Patch Park. Late medieval hall house Timber framed and plastered. This was known as Hunts until the18th. The area also contains a private industrial estate with a mix of buildings – some of which look as if they have a Second World War origin. It is also a paintball games location
Foxburrow Wood

Thames Tributary River Roding - Stapleford Aerodrome

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow in a generally westward direction and is joined by a tributary from the south


Post to the west Ongar Road
Post to the north Shales More
Post to the east Passingford Bridge
Post to the south Stapleford Abbotts

Epping Lane
Shales More Cottages

Ongar Road
Arnold’s Farm with an associated clay pigeon shoot
Walters Farm Stapleford Airfield was opened in 1933 for Hillman Airways, on the Maylands estate. They ran a scheduled service to European destinations including services to Paris. They lost money and moved elsewhere – to become one of the constituent companies for British Airways. When they left the airfield dealt with private aircraft, until 1938 when the Air Ministry opened a flying training school here. During the Second World War squadrons 151 and 46 of 11 group, flying Hurricanes, were based here. In 1941 it became a base for Special Operations Executive, dropping agents behind enemy lines. It was a grass surfaced airfield equipped with Blister aircraft hangars in addition to an existing civilian hangar. It later became the headquarters of the Air Sea Rescue unit. The airfield was hit by two V2 rockets – the second killed 17 and injured 50. There is a memorial on site to those who were killed. After the war it was used by the Royal Engineers after the war to store plant for clearing minefields, and major projects. The Army left in 1948, and the airfield again became private. In 1955 Edgar Percival set up a company here to manufacture his EP9 crop spraying aircraft – building a total of 40. The field is now used by the Stapleford Flying Club and as a family run pilot training centre. It has two long parallel runways one is asphalt at one end, and the other is shorter and grass only. Remains on the site include: a site of a military storage building, the Second World War control tower, gun crew building, broadcasting building, airfield transformer plinth, site of the sewage works, barrack hut, Pickett Hamilton fort built in concrete, a number of concrete pillboxes, underground battle headquarters,
Lambourne VOR aircraft navigational beacon which anchors the North East (NE) Arrival Stack for London Heathrow Airport, and is a fix for air routes to the North

Thursday, 28 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Stapleford Abbotts

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows north towards the Roding


Post to the west Church Lane
Post to the north Stapleford Aerodrome
Post to the east Albyns
Post to the south Stapleford Abbotts

Stapleford Road
Hammonds. 16th house Timber framed and rendered
Woodside Farm

Stapleford Airfield
Southern half and perimeter road only

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Stapleford Abbotts

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows north east towards the Roding


Post to the west Lambourne
Post to the north Stapleford Abbotts
Post to the east Stapleford Road
Post to the south Bournbridge Lane

Hook Lane
Battles Hall. 17th Manor house, Timber framed and rendered. The name Battles is a family name from the 12th,

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding
The Tributary rises in this area and flows northwards to the Roding.


Post to the west Lambourne
Post to the north Church Lane
Post to the east Stapleford Abbotts
Post to the south Lambourne

Featherbed Lane
A bridle way and an ancient green lane with a diverse flora and veteran pollards down its length
Bishop’s moat. Said to be the remains of a defensive structure for Bishop Spencer of Norwich and the original site of Bis
hop’s Hall. It appears to be a moated ancient wood with no evidence of a building. The wood comprises old coppiced Hornbeam, with oak and ash with holly and elder plus wild service-trees in the hedgerow round the large, deep moat.
Broom Grove
Conduit wood. Ancient woodland. There are several ponds here and a spring which makes much if he wood wet underfoot. The wood is made up of oak, ash and Lime.
Conduit well

Hook Lane
Blackbush Farm

Thames Tributary River Roding - Passingford

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows west in a convoluted path. It is joined by two tributaries from the north and one from the south.


Post to the west Stapleford Aerodrome
Post to the north Great Tawney
Post to the east Suttons Manor
Post to the south Albyns
 Albyns Lane

Albyns Lodge, with railings and gateposts to the driveway.

London Road
The Talbot House. This was the Talbot Inn and a coach stop. It is thought this may have been an industrial building before it came into use as a pub. It is 16th timber framed and weather boarded. Behind it is a brick leat with a sluice gate, which may have housed machinery. Game larder. 18th Red brick with hooks and shelves inside Building by the stream. An 18th square red brick building
Passingford Bridge. The bridge is important because of its position on the main road from London and it provides the parish boundary. By the late 16th, the county had accepted responsibility for repairing it and in the late 18th it was rebuilt in brick. It has been repaired at various times, one pier was rebuilt in 1952 and it was rebuilt entirely for the M25.
Post-box cottage – a post office service here dates from at least the late 18th. In the late 19th a telegraph office was set up and in 1930 an automatic telephone exchange. It is now housing, 17th timber framed and weather boarded.

M25

Ongar Road
Passingford Mill. 18th Water mill. This historically belonged to Suttons and is said to have replaced an earlier mill to the south and there may also have been an adjacent windmill. Inside were the names and of the millers, starting with Zach Tuck in 1760. It is timber framed and weather boarded. There is a brick wheel-housing and the original hoist mechanism remains inside. It was converted to turbine operation in early C20, with a stationary engine in a brick building installed in 1930s. It remained in use into the 1980s.
The Mill House – the earlier building is probably 17th and in the wall is said to be a painted sundial dated 1635 plus 'Horas non numero nisi serenas'. A later Mill House was been converted from cottages, from the late 18th. it is said also to have been called Twynhams

Tawney Lane
Cutler's Forge said to have belonged to the Cutlers' Company in the 17th. L-shaped weather-boarded. The forge was in use into the 1950s with two brick furnaces.
cottage 17th red brick
Forge House. 16th Timber framed with C20 pargetting.

Wednesday, 27 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the rRver Roding - Stapleford Abbotts

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding
The tributary flows north and east towards the Roding- it rises in this area in three streams which subsequently join.


Post to the west Stapleford Abbots
Post to the north Passingford Bridge
Post to the east Curftismill Green
Post to the south Stapleford Road

Albans Lane
Albyns Manor. Only a shell of the mansion survived the Second World War and a rocket attack, and this was demolished in 1955 – but much of the interior had already been taken to the United States. What remains is the red brick old service range, or stable, from the 17th and now converted to housing. Some of the staircase from the mansion is inside.
Albyns 18th Coach-house now a farm building. It is red brick, with a timber clock tower with a cupola plus bell, and weathervane
Albyns Garden pavilion from the 17th. It is in red brick, and square and another weathervane, on the roof. There are also brick garden walls with stone coping and gateways with balustrade ball finials. There is a swimming pool on the terrace. There was also once a water tower here.

Bentleyfield Wood

Deerbarn Wood

Church Lane
St.Mary. this church was rebuilt in 19th but dates from 14th and there is evidence of an earlier church. It is in random stone with a yellow brick tower. Monuments to the Abdy family.
Old Rectory Farmhouse, 18th Timber framed, roughcast rendered.

Stapleford Abbotts
The body of St.Edmund is said to have rested here in 1013 – overnight the local lord was cured of an illness. The manor was thus given to the Abbey at Bury and passed to the crown at the dissolution.

Stapleford Road
Bons Farm House, medieval timber framed and plastered.
Pub – The Rabbits

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding
The tributary continues to flow southwards to the Roding


Post to the north Theydon Mount
Post to the east Stapleford Tawney
Post to the south Stapleford Aerodrome
Post to the west Abridge Golf Club


M25
Slips onto the motorway for police only.
Telephone transmitter mast

Shales More.
Ancient woodland plus a small area of secondary wood and a stream forms part of the western boundary. The canopy is mainly ash, alder and coppice near the stream. There is also hornbeam coppice

Stollies Lake – commercial fishing lake

Thames Tributary – Tributary to the River Roding - Theydon Mount

Thames Tributary – Tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south towards the Roding



Post to the west Hill Hall
Post to the north Beachet Wood
Post to the east Stapleford Tawney
Post to the south Shales More

Mount Road
Shown as Brick Kiln Hill – a brick works stood near the church in the 19th and is now a scheduled ancient monument.
St.Michael. the original church was destroyed by lightning and rebuilt in 1611. It is a small building, on a small hill and in the grounds of Hill Hall. In about 1800 the park was extended and the church was brought within the park, but it was fenced off from it in the early 1950s. There are any impressive monuments to the Smith family and some glass brought here from Hill Hall.
Old rectory demolished 1950s or earlier.
Icehouse plantation. This probably refers to an icehouse for Hill Hall which may have dated from the 17th
Site of Mount Hall. Old manor house demolished in the 1950s or earlier
Coleman’s Farm. Late 19th building. In the 18th this was called Cotes
Woodside
Garden Cottage

Park Spring

Thames Tributary -Tributary to the River Roding - Beachet Wood

Thames Tributary -Tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows south to the Roding

TL 49523 00741

Countryside area with a chunk of ancient coppiced woodland with smaller woodland springs. Some cottages and farms

Post to the west Mount End
Post to the south Theydon Mount
Post to the east Stapleford Tawney


Beachet Wood
Ancient woodland with extensive Hornbeam coppice, oak and ash standards. The western edge gives rise to a number of small streams
Keepers cottages - 19th cottages in the wood

Hanging Spring

Tawney Common
Crumps Farm House

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south towards the Roding


Post to the west Shales More
Post to the north Little Tawney
Post to the east Railmead Plantation
Post to the south Passingford Bridge

Stapleford Tawney Road
St.Mary’s Church. The oldest part dates from 1220 and there were ‘restorations’ in 1862 and, after a fire in the 1960s, was renovated and restored again. The building is flint rubble and there is a bell turret which is weather boarded with a shingled broach spire and weathercock. There are two 12th stone coffins and many monuments.
Great Tawney Hall. 17th house, timber framed and weather boarded – a rainwater pipe is dated 1762. There is a moat adjacent. Barn from 17th, timber framed and weather boarded

Tuesday, 26 July 2011

Thames Tributary – Tributary to River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary – Tributary to River Roding
The tributary continues to flow south towards the Roding


Post to the west Theydon Mount
Post to the north Northlands Wood
Post to the east Bob's Barn
Post to the south Great Tawney

Stapleford Tawney Road
Bell’s Cottages. Bell's these were once Bell's Farm and are probably 16th. They are timber framed and rough rendered. In one room is a Sleeping cupboard At one time this was a rectory
Howfield. House built .1700 in red brick with a hidey-hole by a bedroom fireplace.
Old Rectory, 18th brick building plus some weatherboarding with a 13th core. Inside are panelled gun cupboards and in the cellar
a working pump and a well. Lead from the roof has on it "Mark Webster 1861, 1872" plus various graffiti. There is a moated garden and a conservatory with moulded timber frame, cast iron brackets, original winding window opening mechanism and chimneys. Barn, 18th weather boarded and timber framed. Cart shed from the 18th. 18th granary timber framed on steddle stones. Garden Cottage 17th Timber framed and weather boarded
Little Tawney Hall an 18th house later refronted.
The old school, now the village hall.

The Moors

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows south


Post to the north Mole Trap
Post to the west Beachet Wood
Post to the south Stapleford Tawney
Post to the east Berwick Lane




Tawney Lane
Northlands Wood. Ancient pollarded oaks stand on the edge of the wood, and on the parish boundary. In one corner are forty two specimens of the rare wild service tree.
Long Spring

Thames Tributary – River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary – River Roding
The Roding flows south and west


Post to the west Passingford Bridge
Post to the north Stapleford Tawney
Post to the south Curtismill Green


M25

London Road
Suttons Manor Hospital. Private mental hospital.
Suttons. House – this is 19th much of which was lost in a fire.
Outbuilding from the 18th in red brick. One of these could be a dovecote or game larder
Suttons farm House 16th house with parts from 13th. Timber framed and plastered. This is a possible moated site. 18th Barn, timber framed. 18th cart shed. 18th granary and other buildings.
Cottages, 18th in brick
Suttons Lodge. 18th cottage in brick, rendered.

Thames Tributary River Roding - Stapleford Tawney

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows westwards
A tributary to the Roding flows south eastwards


Post to the west Great Tawney
Post to the north Bob's Barn
Post to the east Shonks Mill
Post to the south Sutton's Manor

London Road
Mitchells Farm
Railmead Plantation

Thames Tributary River Roding - Shonks Mill

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and west. It is joined by the mill leat and by a tributary from the north west


Post to the west London Road
Post to the north London Road
Post to the east Navestock Park

London Road
Lawns. 16th house timber framed and rendered. Barn with the date of 1789 carved on a beam, timber framed and weather boarded. Granary 18th timber framed and weather boarded standing on cast iron steddle stones.
Shonks Mill Bridge. This is a medieval crossing and is noted in 1566 as a timber bridge in need of repair and there was the usual dispute over who was responsible. Rebuilt by the County Surveyor, John Johnson, in timber in 1810. It was damaged by floods in 1943 and one abutment was then rebuilt in concrete
Shonks Mill may have been named from a medieval family but the mill itself seems to date from the late 18th. Humped brick bridge and mill race probably 17th although the parapets have been rebuilt. The mill was out of use by 1860, and has since been demolished.
Shonks Mill House
Millers Cottage
Shonks Mill Road

Monday, 25 July 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Navestock Park

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is joined by a tributary from the west. It was once also joined by a tributary from the east.
There is also a mill leat


Post to the west Shonks Mill
Post to the north Navestock
Post to the east Navestock Park

Shonks Mill Road
Mill Spring
Rose Hall Farm. 17th timber framed farmhouse. 18th Cow sheds Timber-framed, weatherboarded. Barn. 17th Timber-framed, weather boarded.
Hook Wood

Navestock Park
Lady’s Pond. The Wetstaff Brook was damned to form this large pond aa part of the landscaping for the park. Now used for private fishing.

Thames Tributary - tributary to the River Roding - Stanford Rivers

Thames Tributary - tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards towards the Roding and is met by another tributary from the north west


Post to the west Bob's Barn
Post to the north London Road
Post to the east London Road
Post to the south Shonks Mill

Berwick Lane

Tenacre wood

London Road
Tracey’s farm. 17th timber framed farmhouse with traces of a moat
Murrells Farm. Barns converted to housing. 16th farmhouse rebuilt after Second World War bombing.
Wayletts. House from the 16th with timber framing
Stonyrocks plantation

Thames Tributary -Tributary to the River Roding - Bob's Barn

Thames Tributary -Tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south towards the Roding

TQ 51749 99804

Countryside area with scattered farms and cottages


Post to the west Little Tawney
Post to the north Berwick Lane
Post to the east Stapleford Tawney
Post to the south London Road

Berwick Lane
Berwick Ham. Old woodland
Twenty Acre Wood
Bobs Barn

Langford Bottom
The Grove
Bobs Barn Wood

Sources
Essex County Council

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding - Stanford Rivers

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding
The tributary flows east towards the Roding

Another tributary flows south towards the Roding

Post to the north School Road
Post to the east Stanford Rivers
Post to the south London Road
Post to the west Berwick Lane

Icehouse wood

Old Rectory Road
Rectory. House dated 1780 but could be older. Central Phoenix Insurance Plaque. Has remains of a moat.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Berwick Lane

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
Berwick Lane
TL 51881 00761

Country side area with woods, scattered farms, and golf courses


Post to the north Knightsland Wood
Post to the west Stapleford Tawney
Post to the south Bob's Barn
Post to the east Stanford Rivers

Berwick Lane
Berwick Farm. Farmhouse House. 15th Timber framed and rendered. Granary 18th. Timber framed and weather boarded on brick piers. Three Barns 17th Timber framed and weather boarded.
Cesslands Farm. 17th farmhouse, timber framed and plastered. 18th Brew house Timber framed and weather boarded.

Sources
British Listed Building. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames tributary – River Roding - Stanford Rivers

Thames tributary – River Roding
The Roding flows west and south


Post to the west London Road
Post to the north Standford Rivers
Post to the east Navestock
Post to the south Navestock Park

Aspen Wood
Said to be ancient woodland

Broom Wood
Said to be ancient woodland


Little Aspen Wood
Said to be ancient woodland

London Road
White Bear . This includes the White Bear Gun Club ground. This old pub is now housing. 18th building
Woodman Pub. 17th building currently owned by Shepherd Neame. Timber framed and weather boarded.
Millrite Engineering Ltd.

Sunday, 24 July 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Navestock

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows south west and west in a loop and is joined by a tributary from the south


Post to the west Aspen Wood
Post to the north Stanford Rivers
Post to the east Kelvedon Hatch
Post to the south Navestock Hall


Ireland Grove
Colliers Spring
Hollingford Spring
Stanford Rivers Sewage works. Discharges into the Roding

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Navestock

Thames Tributary – tributary to the river Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows north towards the Roding


Post to the west Navestock Park



Dudbrook Road
Hazle Spring
Lady’s Hill
Fortification Wood. Earthworks which may be an enclosure to a moated manor. It is however in a good defensive position.
Church Wood
Red Wood
Does Hill Cottages

Shonks Mill Road
Norpar Barns, set up in 1969 as flower drying business and this continues with other sales in a series of barns.
The Granary museum is in a 14th farm building and shows old farming & household implements. It is a timber-framed building with a plaque saying 'J.C. 1788 re-built'
Stable. Weather boarded building probably early 15th and probably not built as a stable.
Navestock Hall Cottages
Navestock Hall Farm. Navestock manor is documented since before Domesday and eventually was in the hands of the Waldegrave family. A 14th inventory describes a building probably on the site of the present Navestock Hall, which is now a farm and dates from the 16th. , a German landmine in 1940 revealed older structures than that on a rainwater head inscribed 'E. W. 1757'
Navestock Hall site. The site of a later manor house, is north-east of the farm. This was built in the 18th by Lord Waldegrave .it had a stable-yard, kitchen gardens and formal gardens. The house was a brick building. In 1811 the house was demolished and later a summer-house was built there and this was replaced by a memorial which is said to be still there.
Navestock Park. This 18th deer park reached from Navestock hall almost to the Roding. It contained two wooded duck decoys. A double avenue, a mile long, ran across the river to the
Ongar road.
Ice House. 19th in yellow brick with a domed top and a doorway at ground level.
St.Thomas the Apostle. 11th church originally rebuilt in the 13th and subject to Second World War bombing. It is flint and rubble with a timber tower carbon dated to the 12th but it withstood the 1940s bomb. In 1954 when Pevsner saw it it was derelict. The organ came from Southwood House, Highgate. There are memorials to the Waldegraves.

Slade’s Farm
This is an old manorial site and there are remains of a moat

Thursday, 21 July 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Stanford Rivers

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows south in a convoluted stream, joined by tributaries from the east an from the west


Post to the north Colemans
Post to the west Stanford Rivers
Post to the east Kelvedon Hall
Post to the south Navestock



London Road
Wash Bridge. This became a county bridge in 1830.
Bridge House Farm. Also known as ‘Wash Farm’ or ‘Bridge Farm’
Stanford Rivers House, 17th house with a 15th core. Timber framed and
rendered.
34 – 38 Two 18th cottages Timber framed and rendered.
Bridge Cottage. 17/18th timber framed and plastered
Union workhouse. Built in 1830-1 this was the workhouse of the poor law union which preceded the Ongar Union. It serving a union of nine parishes, and held 100 inmates. One of the last workhouses built before the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834 its brown brick central hub had windows from which the master could see the various inmates. Ongar Poor Law Union with 24 elected Guardians took over in 1836 representing its 26 parishes. They bought the building and enlarged it to take over 200. There was a school and an infirmary both dating from 1871,
Piggott's Tent factory took over the workhouse buildings after the union closed in 1930. Piggotts was founded in 1780 trading in the City of London at No.10 Old Jewry and are now part of the Crown Group, they specialise in flags and decorative lights as well as tents.
Site of the former Congregational church burnt down in 1927. A single gravestone remains. A black wrought-iron parish sign was erected in the old gateway area as a Millennium feature.

Wednesday, 20 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Kelvedon Hatch

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows westwards to the Roding


Post to the west Navestock
Post to the north Kelvedon
Post to the east - Kelvedon


Kelvedon Hall Lane
Germans Farm and Moat. Germains House may be as old as the 14th when it was probably an open hall house. It is one of the original manor houses of Kelvedon. It is timber-framed and roughcast with some weatherboarding.
The moat is only fragmentary.
Cooks Wood



http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2011/07/thames-tributary-river-roding-kelvendon.html

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Kelvedon Hatch

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows westwards to the Roding


Post to the west Navestock
Post to the north Kelvedon Grange
Post to the east Kelvedon Hatch


Cartshed Wood

High Ash Wood
Kelvedon Hatch Secret Nuclear Bunker. The Bunker was built on farm land which had belonged to J.A.Parrish. It was initially an RAF ROTOR Station and then designated as a Regional Government Headquarters. Later it was used as a civil defence centre. It is 125 feet underground and the entrance is an ordinary looking 'bungalow' amongst trees. There is also a radio mast, a deep well and beds for hundreds of civilian and military personnel. It was decommissioned in 1992 and bought back by the Parrish family. It is now open as a museum and visitor attraction.

Merlincock Wood

Ongar Road
Priors, 17th house, timber framed and pebble dashed.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Stanford Rivers

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south east


Post to the north Mutton Row
Post to the west Stanford Rivers
Post to the east Stanford Rivers
Post to the south Stanford Rivers


London Road
Hare Street
Roding Garage

Mutton Row
St.Margaret. The church dates from 1150 with walls of flint and rubble. The chancel is 14th and there is a leaded broach spire. There is a 1492 chrisom brass. The original dedication was to St. Margaret of Antioch but there is a window to St Margaret of Scotland
Churchyard. The composer of "Run Rabbit Run" and "The Lambeth Walk" is buried here under his real name, Reginald Moxon Armitage.
Stanford Rivers Hall. 18th house with a square red brick front. Could be older.
Stanford Rivers Farmhouse. 17th house, timber framed with brick front. Barn dated 1752 timber framed and weather boarded. Granary from the 18th timber framed and weather boarded on brick piers and steddle stones. Stable 1800 timber framed and weather boarded.

School Road
Stanford Rivers cottages

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Mutton Row

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south east


Post to the north Greensted
Post to the west School Road
Post to the east Colemans
Post to the south Stanford Rivers

Mutton Row
Clarke’s Farm
Rockett’s Cottages

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - School Road

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards towards the Roding


Post to the north Greensted Green
Post to the west Knightsland Wood
Post to the east Mutton Row
Post to the south Stanford Rivers


School Road
Stewarts Farm
Hop Gardens. Caravan site.


Coleman’s Lane
Coleman’s Farmhouse. 16th house Timber framed, and part weatherboarded.

Tuesday, 19 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Toot Hill


Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards towards the Roding

Post to the east School Lane

Post to the west Mole Trap
Post to the south Berwick Lane


Berwick Lane

Knightsland Wood
Wood of hornbeam coppice with tall ash coppice and planted beech trees. There is also elder, blackthorn and spindle as well as wild service trees, often an indicator of found woodland,

School Road
Blake’s Farm. 18th red brick farmhouse. 18th stable block timber framed and weather boarded. 18th Granary Timber framed and weather boarded on brick supports. Brew house, timber framed weather boarded. Now the golf club house
Toot Hill Golf Club. Opened in 1989

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Toot Hill

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards towards the Roding


Post to the west Mole Trap
Post to the east School Road
Post to the south Berwick Lane


Berwick Lane

Knightsland Wood
Wood of hornbeam coppice with tall ash coppice and planted beech trees. There is also elder, blackthorn and spindle as well as wild service trees, often an indicator of found woodland,

School Road
Blake’s Farm. 18th red brick farmhouse. 18th stable block timber framed and weather boarded. 18th Granary Timber framed and weather boarded on brick supports. Brew house, timber framed weather boarded. Now the golf club house
Toot Hill Golf Club. Opened in 1989

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Mole Trap

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
Two tributaries meet and flow eastwards towards the Roding


Post to the north Ongar Park Wood
Post to the east Knightsland Wood
Post to the south Stapleford Tawney


Nickerlands

Tawney Common
Mole Trap. Pub allegedly named for Samuel Threader who invented a mole trap and made enough money out of it to build this house. After his death his wife ran it as a pub, which has continued.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Colliers Hatch

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south east

TL 5051202167

Rural area along the Epping Road and the hamlet of Colliers Hatch

Post to the south Mole Trap

Epping Road
Does Farm
Colliers Hatch Moat House. 17th house with later alterations, timber framed and plastered with exposed timber frame. It has a moat round it.
Roman villas possibly found here. Roman pottery and tile has been visible in the topsoil, and there have been a number of finds – coins, brooches, and copper alloy objects.

Ongar Park Wood
This is made up of three bits of blocks of woodland and a hedge. Much of this is the remnants of a wood that was grubbed up in 1950 and became farmland. It is part of the Birching Coppice which was part Ongar Great Park. It includes hornbeam and hazel, oak and silver birch coppice. There is a damp pond depression in a corner of the wood. The hedge forms the old boundary of Ongar Park Wood and includes old hornbeam coppice, field maple, oak, hazel, dogwood, hawthorn, and blackthorn. The central woodland has a ditch on two sides and a stream on another edge.

Sources
British History online. Essex
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary River Roding - Kelvendon

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and west and is met by two tributaries from the south east


Post to the north Ongar
Post to the east Kelvedon Hatch
Post to the west Stanford Rivers
Post to the south Kelvedon Hatch

Hall Lane
St.Nicholas. not used and neglected. This former parish church is in the grounds of the Hall. There was a medieval church here but there was a complete rebuilding in red brick in the 1750s. The font and a 15th bell have been preserved and some floor slabs were left in place. The church was replac
ed on a different site in the 1890s and the old church, was damaged by a German bomb in 1945.
Kelvedon Hall. House built 1743 For John Wright and rebuilt in the 1930s by Lord Gerald Wellesley and Trenwith Wells. The date on Rain water heads, is 1740-1725. It is red brick, with pavilions on each side, of which one is an oratory, linked with curved walls. Inside is a chapel since the Wrights were Roman Catholic. There is a Lodge, the stable block, orangery and garden walls

Romford Road
Littlebury Mill. There was a mill at Littlebury in 1260and by the 18th this was a water-mill. The current building is 19th weather-boarded on a brick base. In 1946 it was converted to electric power.
Mill Stream – this was filled in during 1952

Ongar Road
Langford Bridge Farm
Park WoodThis is an ancient wood with hornbeam coppice with oak, ash and sweet chestnut.

Thames Tributary River Roding - Ongar

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows south west and is joined by tributaries from the west and from the east.


Post to the north Ongar
Post to the east Stondon Massey
Post to the west Colemans
Post to the south Kelvedon Hall

Brentwood Road
Ongar Garden Centre, Country Gardens

Ongar Road
Langford Bridge. This crosses the Roding and is of reinforced concrete. In 1991 the bridge was thought to be inadequate for the traffic it was taking. A temporary bridge diversion was erected.
Industrial Estate

Stanford Rivers Road
Dyers, Rebuilt in the 18th but may be originally 16th,
Brewery. In the late 19th J. and J. Palmer with a brewery behind Dyers
Grays FarmLittlebury. This manor is first noted in the 13th. The Hall itself is 16th of brick with timber framing and it is now much smaller than it was previously
Marden Ash House. Built by Nicholas Alexander in the 17th. And a new front in red brick added in the 18th. 18th brick stable block with clock turret and cupola.

Monday, 18 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to the River Roding - Colemans

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to the River Roding
The Tributary rises in this area and flows south east towards the Roding




Post to the west Mutton Row
Post to the east Ongar
Post to the south Stanford Rivers
TL 55187 02032

Rural area on the southern outskirts of Ongar

Kettlebury Spring
Kettlebury Spring. It is made up of four strips. The trees are mainly hornbeam coppice with Oak, Ash, Field Maple and Hawthorn. There are also the more unusual wild service-trees.

Romford Road
Little Colemans. 17th timber framed red brick house. 

Stanford Rivers Road
Great Colemans. 19th timber framed brick house

Sources
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Kelvedon Hatch

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows north west towards the Roding


Post to the north Great Myles
Post to the east Clapgate
Post to the west Kelvedon Hall
Post to the south Kelvedon Hatch

Bridge in the park at Great Myles. Built 1770-71 By Richard Woods for John Luther in red brick and stone. It is humped with a single span, curved walls and an stone used on the parapets and the arch keystone . It cost £250 to build and the tributary stream was dammed to form a lake. 

Round Wood
Kelvedon Grange This now two houses – Kelvedon Grange and Old Kelvedon Grange. They were originally built in 1610 and are timber-framed buildings used as the rectory until 1931

Ongar Road
Menagaria Wood. Made up of hornbeam coppice with oak and ash. It is used a horse riding test area.
Pump House Farmhouse 17th house which is timber-framed and pebble dashed

Thames Tributary – Tributary to the River Roding - Clapgate

Thames Tributary – Tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows north towards the Roding

 TL 57646 00211

Countryside area with a lot of commercial


Post to the north Stondon Massey
Post to the east Stondon Massey
Post to the west Kelvedon Hatch
Post to the south Kelvedon Hatch


Bushy Wood

Chivers Road
Stondon Place. This had originally been a farmhouse. William Byrd, the Tudor musician, lived, here following various events concerning the previous Catholic owners- which included efforts to evict him. Eventually in the 18th it was purchased with someone who also owned the Manor and it became the local Manor House again, and the house was rebuilt. Following more changes in ownership it was burnt down and rebuilt in the 1860s apparently using the fabric of the previous building. In the 1950s it was derelict and covered in creepers. It is in red brick and some 18th fireplaces remain inside.
The Coach House. Originally part of the estate of Stondon Place. It is a red brick 18th building with a clock tower

Clapgate Estate
This is a private plot land development with both commercial and residential uses.
Five Acres. Includes a boating lake and woods. Used at one time as a greyhound kennel and there are four stables, kennels, workshop, garage and a log cabin.
Five Elms nursery with greenhouses
Wallace Kennels established by Vera Robinson in 1975 as boarding kennels and later became a sanctuary for all animals in need
Stondon Works

Courtfield Wood
The wood is made up of oak and ash over a ground and there is alder close to the stream. The wood is used for a horse riding courses based at a nearby farm.

Ongar Road
Stondon Manor

Sources
Clapgate. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Wallace Kennels. Web site

Sunday, 17 July 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the Roding - Kelvedon Hatch

Thames Tributary – tributary to the Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows north to the Roding


Post to the west Kelvedon Hatch
Post to the north Clapgate
Post to the east Doddinghurst


Chivers Road
Clapgate. Farm House dating from the 17thm Timber-framed, rendered and colour washed
Chivers

Poles Wood
Rifle range here in the 19th, on the outskirts of the wood and the stands were near Chivers Farm. It was used by the local Volunteer Corps
Now used for motor cycle scrambles.


Saturday, 16 July 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding -Stondon Massey

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is joined by a tributary from the east
A tributary to the Roding flows northwards


Post to the north Hallsford
Post to the east Stondon Massey
Post to the west Ongar
Post to the south Kelvedon Hatch

Ongar Road
Hallsford Bridge Industrial Estate
Little Myles Farm. Farmhouse from 1500, with subsequent alterations. Timber-framed and rendered. This was however a small farm which expanded greatly in the early 18th. It has a three acre garden surrounded by wild flowers and grasses plus ponds, a pergola, a stream. This is an herb garden used for handmade cosmetics.
Chestnut walk
Great Myles. This was a sub manor in Kelvedon and the name came an owner, Miles de Munteny. The house was rebuilt in the 18th – it was red brick and it was said to have a window for each day of the year. It was burnt down and demolished in 1837, and all that remains is the stable block, servants’ wing and outbuildings. The Stable block is in 18th brick with an octagonal wooden lantern with an octagonal clock face. It could take 22 horses and a flat on the first floor.
Chase Cottages

Thames Tributary – Tributary stream to the River Roding - Stondon Massey

Thames Tributary – Tributary stream to the River Roding
The tributary flows north east towards the Roding


Post tothe north Crownlands
Post to the west Hallsford
Post to the south Stondon Massey

Long Edwells
Ancient woodland with oak and ash. There is also elder, hawthorn, and hornbeam


http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2011/06/thames-tributary-river-roding-hallsford.html

Thames Tributaries – Tributary to the River Roding - Stondon Massey

Thames Tributaries – Tributary to the River Roding
The tributary meanders north westwards towards the Roding


Post to the north Stondon Massey
Post to the east Paslow Common
Post to the west Stondon Massey
Post to the south Clapgate


Ongar Road
St.Peter and St.Paul, Church. The church dates to 1100 and is in Flint, rubble, quartzite and there are some Roman bricks and elsewhere in the building tufa. These walls appear to be very early possibly Saxon. The belfry is 15th with three bells from the 15th and 16th. Brasses date to the 16th. William Byrd, the Elizabethan musician is buried in and a Wall plaque commemorates him.
Stondon Massey House. This was the rectory built in 1800 for the then rector
Stonden Hall FarmChurch Wood. Ancient woodland made up of hornbeam coppice plus oak and ash
Round Spring
Reservoir
Stondon Farm
Churchfields Farm

Friday, 15 July 2011

Thames Tributary - Tributary to the River Roding - Paslow Common

Thames Tributary - Tributary to the River Roding
The Tributary flows north westwards to the Roding and is joined by a tributary from the east.


Post to the west Stondon Massey
Post to the south Stondon Massey


Nine Ashes Road
164 Car repair business. Old workshop and Nissen hut
Paslow Common - Village Green
Black Horse. Closed around 2002 and is now a private house
White Horse. Beer house which was next to the Black Horse and burnt down in the 1900s.
Paslow Common Farm
Pumping Station. Tiny brick building over the smaller tributary stream

Picketts Wood

Woolmongers Lane
Fox Farm
Faggs Farm

Thames Tributaries – tributary to the River Roding - Stondon Massey

Thames Tributaries – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows north towards the Roding


Post to the north Paslow Common
Post to the west Clapgate
Post to the south Doddinghurst


Blackmore Road
Tipps Cross Remembrance Hall

Nine Ashes Road
3- 4 16th house now divided into two. Timber-framed, rendered and colour washed. There are the remains of a bread oven inside.
Soams Farmhouse. Timber-framed, roughcast rendered house of 1600.

Ongar Road
Bricklayers Arms
Henry’s Terrace
Brook Farmhouse
. 17th house. Timber-framed and rendered with mock timber-framing.
Cannon's Cottages. House of 1600 divided into two cottages. Timber-framed and rendered
1-4 Giles Charity Almshouses, brick terrace of 16th cottages. A plaque records `The gift of Henry Giles of Stondon Parish 1574 enlarged and repaired 1860'.

Reeves Close
Council houses

Stondon Green
Pond

Tipps Cross Lane
Tipps Cross

Thursday, 14 July 2011

Tributary to the Roding Doddinghurst

Thames Tributary - tributary to the Roding
A tributary to the River Roding rises in this area and flows north towards the Roding




Post to the west Kelvedon Hatch
Post to the north Stondon Massey
TQ586998

Rural area with housing among farms and fisheries

Back Lane
Radio tower

Blackmore Road
Doddinghurst Place moat – this is a Domesday site. The estate was at one time known as Kensingtons
Churchwood Fisheries. Run three carp fishing lakes created in the 1960s.
Soaphouse Farm. Listed farmhouse. Soap was made here in the late 18th
Meadow Farm
Church Wood. This is made up of Hornbeam coppice with alder and ash.

Dealtree Close
Playing field

Hook End Road

Outings Lane
Barfield Farm

School Road

Sources
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Churchwood Fisheries. Web site

Wednesday, 13 July 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Chipping Ongar

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is joined by Cripsey Brook from the west and another tributary from the east

TL 55145 02685

This is the southern part of the interesting and ancient town of Chipping Ongar - the market area near the crossing of the Crispey Brook.  The main street climbs from the bridge past shops and pubs.

Post to the north Ongar
Post to the east Hallsford
Post to the south Langford

The Borough
Cripsey Brook Nature Reserve at Ongar Bridge
Ongar Bridge. The bridge was in place at the end of the 15th. Before that it is probable there was a timber bridge and a ford. The county council took it over and built the present three-arched brick bridge in 1797. It was designed by the county surveyor John Johnson. A raised causeway from the Two Brewers to the bridge was also built. The bridge was widened in the 1950s ad the parapet removed while concrete slab extensions were installed as a pavement
Ongar Gas-works in use 1836-1934. It was begun by gas engineer S.J. Evans, managed in conjunction with the neighbouring brick-works and taken over by the local authority in 1880. It should perhaps be noted that some of both the Barlow and Jones families, who founded many early gas works, lived in this area.
Brickfield opened c.1800 and closed 1917.

Brentwood Road
The Stag
Brewery Cottage. associated with the brewery which stood behind Dyers at Marden Ash
The Gables. built in the 1880s and in the 1930s it was the Mary MacArthur Holiday Home for Working Women,

Coopers Hill
1 Delimores Sandwich Bar
1 Ashley Craft and Galleries in rear building in brick institutional style.
87 Grey End. 18th house which is timber framed with brick extension and a weather boarded central block. It has a cast iron tent porch with ornate trellis, frieze and panelling. It was once called ‘The Nook”.

Castle Street
The southern arm of the town’s defensive structure is preserved in the line of the street.
10 house built 1800 in red brick. There is a brick arch in the wall on the road and an ornate metal porch supported by 6 columns. A brick is inscribed ‘T. Williams 1800’. Currently occupied by a firm of lawyers.
21 White House. This has ‘1599’ on a beam. It is timber framed with the front brick added in 1835 and painted white. 16th fireplace upstairs

Church Approach.
Building at the back of Wren House. Office building from the 19th timber framed and painted plus herringbone weatherboard. Perhaps it was originally a carpenter’s workshop
79 building at the back of the White House. This is 18th and painted brick building
St Martin’s Cottage. 18th house, timber framed and plastered
St.Martin of Tours. A Norman village church with a 15th belfry. It was built of flint, rubble and roman bricks in the 13th with a steeple of weatherboard and shingle with two bells. In the chancel wall us a possible anchorite’s cell from where a small window looks into the chancel and on the outside is a little door. South aisle added in 1840 for boys from Ongar Grammar School. There is a monument by Nollekens to Mrs. Mitford 1776.

Greensted Road
Two Brewers. In business as a pub since 1791. It is timber framed and plastered.
Building at the back of the Two Brewers pub which could be a brew house or a granary. It is 18th, timber framed and weather boarded

High Street
The street widens out at the site of the market place, and narrows at the site of gates which allowed access through the town’s defensive ditch.
25 Essex Economic fire insurance plaque
31-33 18th timber framed, part rendered part weather boarded cottages
35-37 Roseberry Cottages with enameled name plate.
38 plaque saying ‘T Reeve 1825”
39 18th brick house
40 17th house timber framed and plastered with 20th pargetting. There is a plaque with ‘AD.1666; and a pump at the back
51 Cottage, 18th with a painted brick front and timber framed
53 17th house now a shop. Timber framed and plastered
60 Barncroft. House, from the 17th or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered with 20th pargetting.
82-88 Livingstone Cottages once called Chapel Cottages. 2 blocks of cottages with a central passageway. 18th Timber framed and rendered. A plaque says “vested in Trustees for
the benefit of the Congregational Church, pursuant to the wishes of the late Josiah Gilbert 15 August 1892". David Livingstone lived here in 1838 before going to Central Africa
United Reformed Church. This was originally a Congregational Chapel. An access archway to it was constructed through the row of timber framed cottages. It was here that David Livingstone was trained. Isaac Taylor was one of the pastors.
Independent Meeting House – this was opened in 1720 the site of the United Reformed Church, which replaced it in 1833.
85 Central Spares. 17th house, now a shop. Timber framed and plastered.
87 workshops behind. One was used as a lime store. Since demolished
90 18th House with 18th façade. Timber framed and plastered
96 18th house used by Opticians, Pipkin Partnership. The main building follows the line of the outer defences of the Castle. It is timber framed and plastered, with decoration
99 Royal Oak: 400 year old pub.
101-103 Lewis Stationers, and Padmore Butchers. Shops originally part of the public house. 17th with later alterations. Timber framed and rendered
102 House from the 17th with a 20th extension. Timber framed and plastered with 20th pargetting.
104-106 brick house from the 19th divided into two.
107–109 Ongar Post Office in a house from the 16th, now shops. Timber framed and rendered. Workshops at the rear
Parish pound, cage and pillory were at the southern end of the market near the current Post Office. In 1786 they were moved for the Assembly and Card Rooms and later demolished.
Assembly and Card Rooms. These were built in.1786 and demolished c.1830.
108 19th timber framed and plastered house
113 Jessamine Cottage from the 18th timber framed and rendered
115 Jessamine House 114 Holmlea, 1780. Was built in about 1780, but the delicate porch in Adam style is early 19th century.
117 Cottage from the 18th timber framed and rendered and weather boarded.
118 Essex House.
121 to 127 cottages, now shops. 17th timber framed and rendered.
124 pigeon loft at the back
129 Cottage from the 17th, timber framed and plastered with weatherboard. This was the Bell- at one time Ongar’s only free house. It is at the narrowest part of the High Street and marks the site of a gateway across the medieval defensive ditch.
134-140 three shops with 17th origins. Timber framed and plastered.
146–148 Shop in a 17th building originally part of 150, timber framed and plastered.
147-149 This is an 18th house n ow two shops. It is timber framed and plastered
150 Old Corner Shop. This is a 17th building used as a shop. Timber framed and plastered. And there are two attached buildings from the 15th.date of 1582 over the lintel.
151-153 16th house, now a shop. Timber framed and plastered.
152 Wren House. 16th building used as a shop. Timber framed and plastered. There are three steps to the front door with wrought iron rails.
157 Greylands. Red brick garden wall from the 18th and of variable height. A plaque records the property rights and the builder. There is also a plaque recording the town twinning with Cerizay.
161 -165 A 17th building now divided into three shops. Timber framed and plastered with pargetting.
165. 17th building used as a shop. Timber framed and plastered with pargetting. A marble slab records its use by P.J. Carter, family butcher. Old slaughter house at the back plus a boxed wood pump.
171 George Yard building at the back now a shop. It is 17th Timber framed with 19th weatherboarding outbuilding at the back. Used for stabling by Carters Butchers. Built in the 17th timber framed, and plastered. It has loft doors and a louvre on the first floor, all the doors have the original iron hinges.
Market-place. The market’s original site was in the middle of the High Street. There were two market crosses from 1343, removed in the 19th.
171 Kismet Indian, previously the Clifton Café. This is a 17th building which was originally The Market House, or the Butter Market with open arches on the ground floor. It was converted into shops in the 19th Timber framed and plastered. Royal Insurance plaque
174, 176, 178. Three shops in 18th buildings. Timber framed and plastered
177 Kings Head Pub. Late 17th building in red brick with a central carriage entrance. A brick carries the date of "1697 T.P.S.". Sun Fire Insurance plaque. An old coaching inn which was later renamed the Kings Inn and now closed
180–182 two 18th shops. Timber framed and rendered
181 18th brick house which is now a shop.
184-186 Barclays Bank
190-194 three shops from the 18th. Timber framed and plastered
191 -195 These shops were originally houses built in the l7th. Timber framed, part weatherboard, part rendered. A plaque says "Joseph King decd. 28/2/1679 left this row of properties in Trust, to provide, out of the rents, the Schooling for the poor children of this Parish. The Trustees continue to use the income for educational purposes."
198-204 shops from the 18th and 19th timber framed and plastered. Co-operative signage on the front
199- 205 These were built in the 17th as houses but are now shops. Timber framed, part weatherboard and rendered with some original pargetting
201-205 King’s Trust Cottages were left in trust by one, Joseph King, for the education of poor children and the giving of bibles to poor families. He was an Ongar man, who had ironmongery in London, and died in 1678. The cottages are timber framed and the original school occupied part of the building.
Poorhouse opened in 1748 next to the rectory buildings. It was replaced in 1797 on the glebe north of the rectory. Since demolished.
Telephone Kiosk K6. Designed 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Made by various contractors. Cast iron.
Town Hall was demolished in 1896-7 to help traffic congestion.

Marden Ash
This is now essentially a suburb to the south of Chipping Ongar but historically it has links with High Ongar. The name ‘Marden’ has been used since the 11th and means 'boundary valley'. It is thus likely that it marked the boundary of Chipping Ongar and High Ongar.

Shackletons
Rectory. This is a 17th house bought for the rector in 1723. It is Timber framed and rendered.

Stondon Road
Cottage on the corner of Cloverly Road 18th timber framed and weather boarded. .
Newhouse Farmhouse.1600. Timber framed and rendered.

Stanford Rivers Road
The Cottage. Cottage orne lodge from the 18th, timber framed and plastered with a thatched roof, and projecting eaves, supported on rustic veranda posts. It has pointed gothic windows

St James Avenue
St James Church. In 1879 it was felt a church was needed for the Marden Ash area, James Trayler gave the land for a church. The foundation stone was laid in 1882 and the church opened the following year. In 1945 a V2 rocket fell close-by damaging it beyond repair. In 1954 fund raising started for a new church which was opened in 1958 on the original site.
Church hall – built in the 1960s

Sources
British History Online. Ongar. Web site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Ongar Millennium History Society. Web site
Ongar Town Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
St James Church. Web site
St.Martin's Church. Web site
United Reformed Church. Web site
Victoria History of Essex.