Sunday, 19 February 2012

Turkey Brook Enfield Lock

Turkey Brook
Turkey Brook continues to flow eastwards. It is joined by the Small River Lee from the north

Suburban Area between the Ordnance Factory and Enfield Highway and including some areas of industry

Post to the north Waltham Cross
Post to the west Enfield Wash
Post to the east Enfield Lock

Albany Park
Bought by the Council and Trinity College Cambridge in 1902. 

Beaconsfield Road
Built up in 1908 but some houses were occupied in 1902. The eastern end by Ordnance Road is older and was originally called Alma Road.

Bilton Way
Industrial units
75 Winther Browne. They make mouldings and trims and were established 1893 by Mr Winther, a Norwegian dowel manufacturer joined by Harold Browne in 1915, a clerk who then bought the company
Site of a Great War gun site. It was in a field near power station cooling towers but a gun mounting ring had been in place. It had been cleared by 1947

Bradley Road
The developer was Henry Bradley of Bishopsgate in the late 1870s
Bridge over Turkey Brook

Chesterfield Road
Built up in 1908
Chesterfield Road Board School built by Enfield School Board in 1895.

Magnetic Crescent
This area is part of the Innova Science Park built on the site of the Ramney Marsh Sewage Works

Mollison Avenue
The road is named after pioneer aviator Jim Mollison,
Prince of Wales Field – open space with tarmac paths and a playground

Newbury Avenue
Public baths opened here in 1893 following a campaign and local fund raising.  A plaque describing the fund raising efforts was displayed there and is now in the replacement Albany Leisure Centre. There is now housing on the site.

Ordnance Road
Previously known as Lock Lane or Welch’s Lane.  The manor-house of Norris Farm, first noted in 1572, was on a moated site to the north of the road. This was known as Plantation Farm in the 19th. The site was built up for housing in 1972.
Enfield Lock Station. Opened in 1855 and now lies Between Waltham Cross and Brimsdown on One Railway. The railway line from Stratford to Broxbourne was opened by the Northern and Eastern Railway in 1840. The station was opened by the Eastern Counties Railway Ordnance Factory renamed to Enfield Lock, The line was electrified in 1969
Signal box, this was at the end of the platform
Level crossing, once operated by the signalman. The army had wanted a bridge here when the line was built but agreed to have a manned crossing in the end
St Peter and St Paul.  Built in 1969 to replace a church destroyed in the war. Designed by Romilly Craze in brick
Railway Hotel. 19th pub.

Salisbury Road
Prince of Wales School. Built by Middlesex County Council in 1950.  It has a circular hall with a low domed roof

Soham Road
Soham Lane Open Space

Velocity Way
This area is part of the Innova Science Park built on the site of the Ramney Marsh Sewage Works

Warwick Road
Warwick Field Open Space

Sources
Cherry and Pevsner London North
Stevenson. Middlesex
David Pam. Enfield 3 Vols
London Railway Record. articles

4 comments:

Steve Bird said...

Having found this blog through Diamond Geezer's review, I'm fascinated! What it really could do with is a geographical index - I had to look right back almost to the beginning to find any entries near my area (Harrow).

Ben Clarke said...

The public baths listed as Newbury avenue were in fact in bradley road, right next to turkey brook, closed some months after Albany leisure centre opened.

Christine Killick said...

I confirm what Ben Clarke has written that the swimming pool/public baths were in Bradley Road.

Chris England said...

Ben & Christine are defineatley right. My grandfather bought 80 Newbury Avenue new in I beleive 1932. At this time it was the last house in the street Nos. 82 onward being built later to the same design. I was born in No 80 and lived there until 1981. Have many happy if chilly memories of swimming at Enfield Lock Baths and it was most certainly situated at the southern end of Bradley Road.
No. 80 remained in my family until 1992.