Sunday, 14 October 2012

Dean's Brook. Upper Hale

Deans Brook
Deans Brook flows south

Post to the north Stoney Wood
Post to the west Edgware
Post to the south Watling Estate
Post to the east Mill Hill

Ash Close
Brookside. Residential care home which is the remaining property of the John Grooms Crippleage which was on this site.  Called Brookside because it is near Dean’s Brook.

Deans Lane
Until the 1930s this was a country lane across open fields from The Hale, hamlet, to the London County Council’s Watling estate.
Holbrook House. Farmhouse which is now the site of John Keble Church
John Keble Church. In 1932 this was a building contractor's hut and a church built soon afterwards. Built in 1936 by D.F.Martin-Smith with a reinforced concrete frame faced with brick. The font was originally a mortar in the kitchen of Devonshire House, Piccadilly.
Baden Powell Hall. This was originally in the hut which was the first church and is, obviously, used by the scouts and guides
142 John Keble Church Hall

Edgware Way
This was the first regionally important new road in Edgware and was part of the Watford by-pass built in 1927.
Apex Corner. Also called Northway circus this is a large roundabout at the northern end of Watford Way. The A1 and A41 separate here, with the A1 continuing straight north and the A41 turning west. Selvage Lane runs from here southwest to Mill Hill and Marsh Lane goes northeast to Totteridge. There is no interchange with the M1.

Hale Lane
Hale probably means 'the nook or comer’ from an Old English word and it refers to its location in the far north-west comer of the old parish of Hendon
Upper Hale. The hamlet lay at the junction with Deans Lane in the 18th. It was also known as the Green Man after the pub. Hale Lane is partly in the Edgware Eruv.
Lower Hale. The area around the Dean’s Brook Bridge. 
Bridge over Deans Brook. This was a ford until 1926
128 The Jolly Badger. This is a rebuilt Green Man which was famous in the 19th for sports such as boxing and had been on site since at least the mid-18th. The pub was rebuilt as it is today in the late 1920s and had its name changed in the late 1980s. It is now a Harvester Inn.
129 The Railway Tavern
Mathilda Marks Kennedy Jewish Primary School. The school is in an 18th house once called Maxwellton, and before that Shakerham farm. It is the oldest building in the Hale.  The Mathilda Marks-Kennedy School is named after Mathilda Marks the daughter of Michael Marks, founder of Marks and Spencer. She was a philanthropist for educational and medical causes. The school was originally in Golders Green, where it was called Barclay House but moved here in 1989. The building here was previously St.Anthony's Catholic Preparatory School.
John Groom’s­­­­ Crippleage. John Alfred Groom was a London engraver and evangelical preacher. He was concerned about the disabled women who sold flowers and watercress near Farringdon Market and he founded the Watercress and Flower Girls' Christian Mission in 1866 based in Clerkenwell and where inmates made artificial flowers. In 1931 the charity bought an estate in Edgware, including men in 1965. By 1990 they were called John Groom's Association for Disabled People and are now called Livability having merged with the Shaftesbury Society. The Edgware site has been redeveloped as housing.

Lilley Lane
Footpath from Hale Lane to Tudor Gardens. It is inside the Edgware Eruv

M1
In 1928 there was a plan a major road to run from the junction of Watling Street and Edgware Way across Edgware to the Barnet by-pass. Eventually in 1967 the M1 was opened running north-west from Mill Hill.  

Selvadge Lane
Gibbs Green. Small green at the junction with Gibbs Green Lane. A remainder of the countryside marooned in a sea of ghastly semidetached houses

Stoneyfields Lane
Stoneyfield Estate. This was a 100 acre estate sold for building in the 1920s.

Sources
Apex Corner. Wikiepedia website
British History. Edgware. Website
Field. London Place names
John Keble church website
Livability web site
London Borough of Barnet web site
Mathilda Marks Kennedy School web site
Middlesex Parish Churches
National Archives. Web site
The Hale. Wikipedia Web site

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