Monday, 30 January 2012

Black Ditch Dowding Way

Black Ditch
The Black Ditch flows westwards towards the River Lee

Countryside area with a some main roads

Post to the north Waltham Abbey
Post to the south Avey Lane
Post to the west Waltham Abbey
Post to the east M25 Junction 25 High Beech




Dowding Way.
Link road built in the 1990s

M25

Round Hills Wood


Sources
SABRE. Web site

Black Ditch - Avey Lane


Black Ditch

Black Ditch flows westwards towards the River Lee

Rural area south of Waltham Abbey. This is an area of market gardening with scattered farms, many now have become livery stables

Post to the east High Beech
Post to the north Dowding Way

Avey Lane
Many nurseries and greenhouses
Avey Lane Farm. 19th yellow brick farmhouse

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Black Ditch - High Beech

Black Ditch
The Black Ditch rises in this area and flows eastwards towards the River Lee

Post to the west Avey Lane
Post to the north M25 Junction 25 High Beech




Avey Lane
High Beech Village Hall

Manor Road
Arabin House. 16th house remodelled 1800. Said to be where Tennyson lived with Judge Arabin. Coach house, stables and entrance gates

Pynest Green
Hanbury Riding School
Pynest House
High Beech Riding School. The owners began by offering rides on their own horses and then started the school at what was then Packsaddle Farm. The indoor school was built in 1972. The school now has 32 horses.
Gates to Beech Hill Park.
The Rookery. Tennyson lived on a house on this site, part of Beech Hill Park, from 1837 to be near his brother who was in care nearby.
Gardens of Hanbury. Donald Miller bought the site in 1970 as a 19th walled vegetable garden. It is now a leisure park for retired people. 18th materials have been used for buildings and there are games areas, as well as a picnic area.

Rat’s Lane
Bantham Bowls Club

Wellington Hill
High Beech Golf Course
Duke of Wellington. The pub dates to at least the mid-19th
Christian Community Holiday Home founded 1926. This became the Epping Forest Youth Hostel between 1964 and 2008. It operated with a rota of volunteer wardens who opened it up at weekends. Partly on the site of Riggs Retreat

Sunday, 29 January 2012

Cobbins Brook - Waltham Abbey


Cobbins Brook
The Brook flows west towards the River Lee
The Black Ditch flows westwards towards the River Lee


Post to the west Ramney Marsh
Post to the north Waltham Abbey
Post to the east Dowding Way


Black Ditch
The ditch has been ‘re-profiled’ within the new park and is now the boundary between new housing of Meridian Park and the new Gunpowder Park. It previously ran within the Government Research Establishment.

Black Ditch Road.
This road, previously within the factory area has now gone except as a partial pathway within the park.

Dowding Way
New road built from the 1990s.

Meridian Line
Meridian Park. New housing built on part of the Royal Gunpowder Factory site.
Meridian Way
New road built from the 1990s
Sainsbury’s Distribution Depot

Sewardstone Way.
This road, previously within the factory area has now gone except as a partial pathway within the park

Sewardstone Road
The Royal Gunpowder Factory developed this area, in the late 1880s, on fields of Quinton Hill farm, for the manufacture of guncotton and later nitroglycerin and cordite.  Initially laid out in the area between Cobbins Brook and Black Ditch It was intended to bring the whole manufacturing process into a site with rationally laid out buildings. The eastern part of the site contained the nitroglycerine and cordite factories. The site finally closed, as the Government Research Establishment, in 1991.
Gunpowder Park. The Park has shrubs and trees planted in blocks, to make a landscape which mirrors the area’s previous use. Bands of trees are laid out to as if appear as ‘shock waves’ fanning out like an explosion.  An area which contained rows of blast testing bunkers is planted with willow in rectangular blocks. Gabion wall of recycled materials.  The Meridian Line runs north-south through the park.

Cobbins Brook - Waltham Abbey

Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook flows west and south and is joined by a tributary from the south east

Post to the east Ninefields Estate
Post to the north Paternoster Hill
Post to the west Waltham Abbey
Post to the south Dowding Way

Brookside
Built on the site of Broomstick Hall Farm

Broomstick Hall Road
Stouts Bridge which went over Cobbins Brook
2-4 19th weather boarded houses.
King Harold Business and Enterprise Academy, King Harold School was founded in 1952 through the merger of two boys board schools
Waltham Abbey Sports Centre

Hillhouse
Hillhouse CofE Primary School
Hillhouse Youth Football Club Ground

Honey Lane
Leverton Infant School.  Thomas Leverton was a developer who died in 1824 and his tomb is in Waltham Abbey graveyard. His wife set up a school in Highbridge Street, for 20 poor boys and 20 poor girls.  In 1899 the building was sold and the school was re-housed in an old National School. In 1906 the school moved to Paradise Row and then closed in 1942. The current school was built as an open plan school in 1971 and the Nursery School in 1998
Leverton Junior School. Thomas Leverton left money for education in the area in 1824. This school building opened in 1971.

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Ninefield Estate

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
A number of tributary streams rise in this area and flow north west to Cobbins Brook

Post to the north Pick Hill
Post to the west Waltham Abbey
Post to the south M25 Junction 25 High Beech
Post to the east Upshirebury




Honey Lane Hospital. This was an isolation hospital built in 1905 for Buckhurst Hill, Chingford and Waltham Cross. It has three wards and included a farm and its own sewage disposal plant. By 1934 it included Chigwell, Wanstead as well as Loughton, and Epping and had expanded to 130 beds. New buildings included a nursing home, a laundry and a water tower. Under the NHS it became part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board and was the second largest hospital in the Group. As the threat of diphtheria diminished so some beds were used for TB patients. In 1952 it was renamed Honey Lane Hospital and began to admit general medical cases but by 1980 wards were used for geriatric patients and by 1982 the Hospital had 73 beds for long stay patients and GP cases. The Hospital closed in 1986. The site was sold.  The buildings demolished for new houses which now cover most of the area between its site and Ninefields.

Ninefields Road

Ninefields Estate; local authority housing built in the early 1970s.

Upshire Road
Upshire Primary Foundation School. The school dates from 1939 but has been greatly extended since. The school originated with a school opened in 1853 and maintained by Sir Thomas F. Buxton at Warlies. In 1877 it was transferred to the Waltham school board. In 1939 it was moved to its present site and became a juniors and infants school in 1951.

Southend Lane
Upshire Hall. 18th red brick building. This was once called South End and was a farm house
Southend Farm. 17th  Farmhouse in red brick. Fishing lakes nearby.

Woodgreen Lane
Warlies Park Farm. Farmhouse with barn and dairy converted to housing.
Ninefield House

Saturday, 28 January 2012

Cobbins Brook - Paternoster Hill


Cobbins Brook

Cobbins Brook flows south west towards the River Lee

Post to the west Waltham Abbey
Post to the east Pick Hill
Post to the south Waltham Abbey

Galleyhill Road
Abbey View Nursery

Paternoster Hill
Queens Head. Dates to at least the 1880s

Cobbins Brook - Pick Hill


Cobbins Brook

Cobbins Brook flows south west towards the River Lee and is joined by a tributary from the north

Post to the north Breach Barns
Post to the west Paternoster Hill
Post to the south Ninefields Estate

Pick Hill

Pickhill farm
Barn Court - conversion of unbelievable proportions

Road
Leads to a selection of nurseries and vegetable farms. Some derelict, some not, some now scrap yards, some burnt down

Warlies Park
Cobbin Pond. Also called Buxton’s Pond – it dates from the early 20th when the Buxton family owned the house. Features bullrushes.
Wood south of the pond with oak and hornbeam
Wood west of the pond in a wet area with willow, blackthorn and elder
West Hill

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Breach Barns

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
The tributary flows south towards Cobbins Brook

Post to the east Cobbinsend
Post to the south Pick Hill


Essex countryside with nurserys and an estate of caravans and temporary housing
Breach Barns Lane
Breach Barns Farm
Breach Barns Caravan and Mobile Homes Park
Fourways Nursery
Oakwood Nursery
Brookmeadow Farm
Path to site of Monkhams Rifle Range
Sewage Works, disused
Maple Springs
Obelisk. The obelisk is supposed to represent the place where Boadicea fell. It is 18th and alongside the stream at the back of Fourways Nursery. It is one of two – the other is to the east of here.

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria County History. Essex

Cobbins Brook - Cobbinsend

Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook continues to flow south west towards the River Lee
TL 41781 02772

Farmland and woodland near Waltham Abbey

Post to the east Spratts Hedgerow Wood
Post to the west Breach Barns

Brookmeadow Wood. Hornbeam and hazel coppice woodland plus oak, ash and sycamore. This area is part of a flood water retention scheme.
Cobbins Brook. Flood prevention work on Cobbins Brook. An embankment has been built plus a culvert to let water pass through the embankment. There are also control gates to limit the rate at which water leaves the flood storage area. There is also a screen to collect large items of debris. An existing weir has been left in place.

Cobbinsend Lane
Cobbinsend Farm with 19th weather boarded farmhouse
Maynards Farm, 19th yellow brick farmhouse and weather boarded outbuildings

Fernhall Lane
Fernhall Farm. Red brick farmhouse 19th but there was an earlier building here. Barn 18th tarred weatherboarding and timber frame

Scatterbushes Wood. Ancient woodland with hornbeam coppice with a oaks and ashes

Stocking Grove. The wood is made up of hornbeam coppice with some oak. There is a stream to the north part of the wood

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Friday, 27 January 2012

Cobbins Brook - Spratt's Hedgerow

Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook flows west towards the River Lee

Post to the east Copped Hall Estate
Post to the north Parvill
Post to the west Cobbinsend

Rookery Wood. Woodland with oak and hornbeam. There are also planted hybrid poplars. There is a crescent-shaped lake on the eastern side which was part of the landscaping of Copped Hall and called the Lagoon and Fish Canal. It is now an area of sedge, alder and willow

Spratts Hedgerow Wood. This is an ancient woodland with several important oaks as well as hornbeam and hazel coppice. There are bridle paths throughout.
Pillbox – a brick and concrete pillbox part of the defence of the Outer London Stop Line ring. It is on the north east corner of sprat’s hedgerow wood.
Outer London Defence Ring anti-tank ditch can be seen for a short distance as a small gully running from the pillbox near Cobbins Brook

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Parvill

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
The tributary flows south towards Cobbins Brook

Post to the east Orange Wood
Post to the south Spratt's Hedgerow Wood

Road
The road to Parvill from All Saints church links the medieval manors of the area and is thus likely to be ancient
Outer London Defence Stop Line Ditch– this crossed the field from Parvills Farm gate and then continued along the field boundary to the corner of Gills Plantation
Balhill Wood. This is ancient woodland containing Oak and Hornbeam coppice. There is also some planted Scots Pine and Larch.
Pillbox An octagonal brick and concrete pillbox stands near the north east edge of the wood. This was part of the structure of the Outer London Ring anti-tank ditch
Parvill. Farmhouse. This is 16th including part of an earlier building. It is Timber framed and plastered and with many ancient features still in place. There is a puddingstone boulder near the gate. A Second World War pillbox stood by the gate as part of the defence of the Outer London Stop Line. Some small pieces of concrete remain,
Barn and granary from the 16th also Timber framed and weather boarded which is now converted to housing.
Gills Plantation. A plantation containing oak, ash and hazel. There is a bridle path lined with pines. Pillbox. An octagonal structure of brick and concrete on the north east corner as part of the Outer London Defence Ring and Ditch. It is adjacent to a water filled gully.

Cobbins Brook - Orange Wood

Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook flows south west towards the River Lee and is joined by a tributary from the south and another from the north.

Post to the north Epping Upland
Post to the east Bury Farm
Post to the south Copped Hall Estate
Post to the west Parvill

Gills Farm.
Gills was a manor of Epping and took its name from that of a family which were Waltham Abbey’s tenants there, and it later became part of the Copped Hall Estate. The farmhouse is a 16th building, timber-framed, plastered, and weather-boarded. Like every other manor in the area  - there is also a moat.

Orange Field Plantation
Oak in a plantation with scots pine and poplar. There is also some coppiced hazel and some other self generating woodland. There are paths and bridle paths and a pond.

Orange Peel
A strip of oak woodland

Orange Wood
Oak woodland with some other trees and in a wood criss-crossed with bridle paths.

Tributary to Cobbins Book - Copped Hall Estate

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
The tributary flows northwards towards Cobbins Brook
TL 4386602131

Countryside area adjacent to the Copped Hall Estate












Post to the south Copped Hall Estate
Post to the north Orange Wood
Post to the west Spratt's Hedgerow Wood

Fitches Plantation
Rectangle of woodland with a strip projecting from the north east corner and a pond in the same area.  There is oak with hawthorn, elm, elder and sycamore.
Pillbox at the tip of the projection. Octagonal and built of brick and concrete
Outer London Defence Ring – ran north-south down the eastern edge of Fitches Plantation

Little Rookery Wood
Oak woodland plus an area of hornbeam near the centre. There are paths and bridleways through the wood

Pondfield Plantation
Ash and hazel woodland

Spratts Hedgerow
A narrow stretch of wood with poplar and scots pine recently planted
Pillbox of brick and concrete, octagonal pillbox hidden in woodland on the north east corner of the wood

Tributary Stream
In parts this stream acted as part of the anti-tank ditch built as part of the Outer London Stop Line.

Sources
Defence of Britain, Web site
Essex County Council. Web site

Cobbins Brook - Copped Hall Estate

Tributary to the Cobbins Brook
The Tributary flows north towards Cobbins Brook
TL 43029 01519

Part of the huge Copped Hall Estate

Post to the south Ambresbury Banks
Post to the north Copped Hall Estate
Post to the west Epping Bell Common

Road between Copped Hall and Epping Road
Concrete pillbox stands in woodland on the south side. This is part of the Outer London Defence ring guarding the anti tank ditch

Copped Hall
Copped Hall Home Farm. The farmhouse is a red brick 19th building. Dairy red brick 19th model farm building
Lake. This is a man made feature east of the mansion, has an island, a summerhouse and a collapsed boathouse. There is some carp fishing. Pillbox on south west corner of the lake.  This is part of the Outer London Defence ring guarding the anti tank ditch.
The White House. 19thEstate house in a 16th vernacular style.


Sources
Defence of Britain. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry, Essex
Pillbox. Web site

Thursday, 26 January 2012

Cobbins Brook - Bury Farm


Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook flows south west towards the River Lee and is joined by a tributary from the south east.
TL 45048 02615

Countryside area on the outskirts of Epping.

Post to the north Epping Upland
Post to the east Epping
Post to the west Orange Wood


Bury Lane
Bury Farm. This was a possession of Waltham Abbey from the 11th until the dissolution. The farmhouse is 16th a timber framed and plastered building.  The farm comprises 18th ranges and a listed 17th barn. Outside the yard is a 19th cart lodge. All of these are timber framed. There is also a modern pre-fabricated cow shed and circular horse management area. There is one arm of a moat and filled ponds.

Epping Road
Cobbins Bridge

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Web site

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Epping

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
The tributary rises in this area and flows North West towards the brook

Post to the north Epping

Bakers Lane
Archimedean Ironworks established by William Cottis in 1858, which made metal products. Demolished in the 20th century

Bolt Cellar Lane
A bridle way bordered with a large hedgerow

Bury Lane
Epping Burial Ground opened 1911. There are 3 graves of casualties from the Great War and 20, from the Second World War

Coronation Hill
Epping Primary School

High Street
88 & 90. 18TH houses with modern shops on the ground floor.
98 - 102 The Cottage. 17th plastered houses
St. John the Baptist. Built in 1889 on the site of a chapel of ease to All Saints at Epping Upland.  It began in the 14th as a chapel belonging to Waltham Abbey and after the dissolution a vicar was appointed under the Bishop of London. This was confirmed by the crown but it was given to John Cocks of Broxbourne but retaining the rights of people from Epping for use for divine services. It was later sold on, including a house called Chapel Hall, but the same provision applied to the chapel. It was later regarded as a chapel-of-ease to All Saints, and served by their vicar until 1764 and then trustees employed a chaplain with the vicar as a trustee. In 1824 it received grants from Queen Anne's Bounty, and in it became the parish church in 1888. The chapel had been enlarged in 1622, and further work done in successive years and then various rebuilding schemes considered. It was rebuilt in in 1832 the chapel was rebuilt to the designs of S. M. Hubert and money in legacies allowed more work to be done. In 1889, it was demolished and replaced by a building, designed by Bodley and Garner, and there have been additions to this since.
Markets were held here from the early middle ages, and there were two successive market houses here, both now gone. The first was alongside the chapel which was the predecessor to St.John’s church.
123 Council depot & National House offices
117a Hawthorn Lodge. This was used as Council offices until 1972.
Fire station
Epping Methodist Church. Built 1887 when the congregation moved here from Hemnal Street.
Barclays – this was previously the Duke of York, pub
Drinking trough and monument. This was originally erected in 1887 and money raised by public subscription. In 1961 it was removed by the Council during redevelopment and used as landfill at the rear of the Baptist Church. Then in the 1970s and 1980s people tried to find it and specialist equipment failed to find it but eventually excavators retrieved it by chance and in 1989 it was replaced.
Empire Cinema was opposite the Church. and it closed in 1954. Originally built as a town hall it opened in 1912 having been a skating rink and by the early 1920’s was operated by Shipman & King. It was reopened 1924, and re-named Picture Palace, but was partly burnt down in 1935, and was re-built as the Empire. It became a Tesco supermarket and is now a photographic studio

Lower Swaines
Lower Swaines recreation ground
Swaines Green Nature Reserve is a green corridor between two sections of Epping Forest. It is made up of four fields. Forties Field which is now scrub typically thickets of oak, ash, hawthorn and blackthorn and some grassland. Lower Lincoln’s Field with grassland. Middle Lincoln's Field grassland with a water source and water plants. Lovelocks Meadow with few trees and some scrub

St.Johns Road
This was originally a small road, called Chapel Lane, giving access to the National School
5, 7, 9, 11, 11a, 15 18th houses with white weather boarded fronts
Epping Hall. New building on the site of a previous hall inherited from the Women’s Institute
Epping Primary School. In 19th national school building previously used byEssex County Council as an Adult Education Centre
Epping Library

Tower Road
St. John’s Church of England School. Specialist engineering college.

Wednesday, 25 January 2012

Cobbins Brook - Epping Upland

Cobbins Brook
Cobbins Brook flows from two sources south west towards the Lee. It is joined by a tributary from the south east and another from the north west.

Post to the north Marles Farm
Post to the west Epping Upland
Post to the south Epping

Upland Road
Hayleys Manor Farm. 19th red brick farmhouse which is on the site of the original medieval Hayleys manor.  This was one of the original manor of Epping and took its name from a 14th family. In 1840 the manor was owned by the parish of St. Anne and St. Agnes, Aldersgate but was later merged in the Copped Hall estate. Part of the moat survives near the stream to the west of the house.
Pinch Timber Farm. Farmhouse 16th Timber framed and weather boarded .18th Barn, timber framed and weather boarded

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Epping Upland


Tributary to Cobbins Brook

The tributary flows north east towards Cobbins Brook

Post to the north Shingle Hall
Post to the west Epping Upland
Post to the east Epping Upland
Post to the south Bury Farm

Epping Road
All Saints Church. This was the original church for Epping, of which the church in the town was a chapel of ease. It is built of flint rubble covered in pebble- dash. The nave appears to be 13th and there have been many additions since. It was originally a possession of Waltham Abbey passing to the Crown at the dissolution. There is a 16th red brick tower. There are six bells and a bell chamber in the tower with notices about notable ringing sessions. Also on the tower is a clock – which is fixed on a place where it can be seen by latecomers from Epping. There are many monuments including a brass to Palmer, Professor of Common Law at Cambridge.  John Overall was vicar here in 1592; he is one of the people who helped translate the Authorised Version.
Churchyard. There is a mounting block outside the church. There is a Giant Redwood, Wellingtonia alongside the church
Elm Cottage.  18th house in red brick originally used as the church house. In the early 19th it became the Chequers pub. Now housing.

Upland Road
Takeleys. This was a manor once called Claygarth, taking its name from 15th tenants. It is a 17th timber frame house, with inside a carved fireplace and 17th floral wall painting. The surrounding moat is almost complete.
Takeleys Farm Cottages
Eppingbury Farm. Owned by Waltham Abbey this was the original manor for the area. The manor house lay to the south of here at Bury Road.

Tuesday, 24 January 2012

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Epping

Tributary to Cobbins Brook
The Tributary flows north west towards Cobbins Brook
Another tributary flows north west towards Cobbins Brook

Post to the east Wintry Park
Post to the south Epping
Post to the west Bury Farm
Post to the north Epping Upland

Lindsey Street
Shaftesbury Farm

Monday, 23 January 2012

Tributary to Cobbins Brook - Wintry Park


Tributary to Cobbins Brook

The tributary flows north west to Cobbins Brook

Post to the west Epping


Frampton Road
Lindsey Street Community Centre, The Association and hall was founded and built by local residents in the early 1950`s for local families. Its original small wooden building has been greatly extended with the addition of a large hall

High Road
The turnpike road started from the junction with Thornwood Road
Brickfield House and Business Centre. Site of previous brickfield.

Lindsey Street
30 site of Epping Brewery.the stables, hay loft and dray house remain in the garden of the house which was built over the old engine house, copper and steam plant as an off-licence in 1950. The bottling store remains in light industrial use

Thornwood Road
This was previously called The Plain.
Epping Plain. Together with Wintry Wood this makes up the Great Forest – a detached part of Epping Forest
Wintry Park Farm. Late 18th farmhouse.  Wintry means 'winter enclosure' and is noted in 1200
Wintry Park House. The name is first noted in 1403 and this was a farm in the 18th
Almshouses. Built as part of a bequest from Stonards. Built in 1877; as three double-fronted cottages, in red brick
Wintry Wood. The wood is part of the Great Forest and the name of Wintry Wood has been transferred here from the opposite side of the turnpike road
Wintry Wood Cottage & Kennels
Hole in the Wall Garage –site being redeveloped

Cobbins Brook - Marles Farm


Cobbins Brook

Cobbins Brook flows east towards the Lee
A tributary of Cobbins Brook flows south

Post to the west Shingle Hall
Post to the south Epping Upland

Marles Farm
The manor of Marles was probably part of the Domesday manor of Epping taking its name from a family called Madle or Mascle. Manor courts were still being held in the early 19th. The farmhouse is a 17th timber-framed building and there are the remains of a moat.
Marles Farm Cottage

Cobbins Brook - Shingle Hall


Cobbins Brook

Cobbins Brook flows eastwards to the River Lee

Post to the east Marles Farm
Post to the south Epping Upland

Site of Shingle Hall. The Hall was part of the Waltham Abbey estate. The manor extended into Great Parndon and the name came from the roof of shingles on the medieval house. It is first mentioned in 1253.  In 1303 it had a windmill. It subsequently became part of the Copped Hall estate until the 16th. At the dissolution of Waltham Abbey it passed to the Crown and was granted to Lord Morley. Manor courts were still held here in the 19th century. The manor house was demolished in 1899 and cottages built on site although the moat remains.

Cobbins Brook - Epping Upland


Cobbins Brook

Cobbins Brook rises from a number of sources in this area and flows north east towards the River Lee.


Post to the east Epping Upland
Post to the south Orange Wood



Epping Road
All Saints Vicarage
Sports Field

Road
Hunters Hall Cottages
Chambers Manor Farm – now housing as Chambers Manor Mews
Chambers Manor. The manor of Chambers was probably connected to Waltham Abbey. The name comes from the family which held it in the 14th and 15th but merged into the Copped Hall estate in the 18th.  The manor house is probably 17th and is timber-framed building, re-faced in brick. Part of a moat survives.

Track
Hunters Hall Farm. Probably 16th in origin