Thursday, 3 January 2013

River Brent Brentham

River Brent
The Brent flows west and southward
TQ 17254 82337

An idealistic and ideal estate built close to the heavy industry of Alperton

Post to the west Perivale

Alperton Lane
Trading area with art deco factories now in other use
15 Joy and King Furniture factory. 1950s having previously been in Kensal Rise.

Birkdale Road
9 rose garden where a new rose - 'Little Wren' was developed.  The area was famous for its rose societies and rose growing.

Brentham Gardens Estate
Brentham Gardens. Housing built by  Henry Vivian and Ealing Tenants Co-op 1910-1915 as West London’s answer to Hampstead Garden Suburb, for Ealing Tenants Ltd,  who were pioneers of the Co-Partnership movement. Vivian was a trade unionist and carpenter who set up a copartnership building company to provide its members with work and accommodation. He set up the Brentham Garden Suburb following the philosophy of the garden city movement each tenant taking a share in Ealing Tenants Ltd. It included a social institute, library, tennis courts and a bowling green. The houses were designed with large gardens. The project's management body was Ealing Tenants Ltd of which Vivian was chair. The suburb was built on the land of Pittshanger Farm and on Lower Wood Field. The first fifty houses built by 1905, were very ordinary but a change came after 1907, when further land was acquired and Raymond Unwin and Barry Parker became involved. Unwin laid out an area of winding roads, cul-de-sacs and picturesquely composed corner areas. Low hedges, playing fields and neighbourhood together helped to foster the rural image. Most of the assets were sold to the Liverpool Trust, a subsidiary of the Bradford Property Trust Ltd, who own Saltaire

Brentham Way
The lower part was designed by G Lister Sutcliffe and the roughcast was left unpainted and windows were all painted in the same dark green. The top part was not developed until the mid-1920s and the architect was Cecil George Butler, who was by then the architect for Co-partnership Tenants in Hampstead. They are in a simplified Arts and Crafts style but on a somewhat grander scale since they were designed to be for sale
2 Widecombe Lodge. Designed by Parker and Unwin. It has stepped access into a secluded walled garden with a stream', waterfall and pond. It was built for William Hutchings who was chairman of Ealing Tenants from 1911 to 1934.

Brunner Road
Sir John Brunner. He was a director of Co-partnership Tenants, Ltd and, of course, Brunner-Mond Co., Ltd.
One of the first roads on the Ealing Tenants Estate. Built 1901.

Brunswick Road
The road runs along an old field boundary of Pittshanger Farm
Butterfly House on the corner of Brunner Road is Unwin’s solution for a corner building.

Denison Road
Frederick Denison Maurice was a founder of the Christian Socialists movement and a proponent of co-partnership.
Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties had small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments. It was designed by G Lister Sutcliffe and the roughcast was left unpainted and windows were all painted in the same dark green
Denison Green. between here and Ludlow Road has always been left uncultivated apart from during the Second World War when it was used to grow food. It contains a large oak that was an old field tree once reputedly the focus of Druidic ceremonies
St Barnabas’ Church. Designed by Ernest C Shearman, in dark purple brick dressed and red brick inside. The land was sold by Ealing Tenants Association to the church authorities at a substantial profit and planned west towers were not built. Shearman fell out with everyone and the church was finished by Ernest Taylor in 1911.
War Memorial

Fowlers Walk
The lower part was designed by G Lister Sutcliffe and the roughcast was left unpainted and windows were all painted in the same dark green
81 - 83 originally offices for the Estate management built in the 1920s.

Holyoake Walk
George Holyoake was a secularist and one of the founders of the co-operative movement
Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties had small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments

Lindfield road
Pitshanger Methodist Church

Ludlow Road
Ludlow was a Christian Socialist and founder of the Co-partnership movement.
Built by F.Cavendish Pearson for Ealing Tenants. Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties had small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments

Marsh Road
Council depot refuse disposal, Brent Alperton site now operated by Veolia
Wembley Dust Destructor.  In the early 1930s it became no longer possible for Wembley to dispose of its refuse by barging it down the Grand Junction Canal to West Drayton.  The new plant was built by Heenan and Froude and designed to deal with 100 tons of refuse in an 8-hour shift.  It allowed for the separation of metal, rags, glass, paper and bones, but as the amount of plastic increased and coal cinders decreased it became difficult to manage. It was closed in 1975, and the chimney was demolished in 1978
Sewage works on the site earlier. Wembley had taken this over from a predecessor body but the management was poor and Sewage polluted the Brent and led to successful actions by Greenford and Ealing urban districts against Wembley in 1897 and 1898.

Meadville Road
Institute. This is now Brentham Club. It was designed by George Lister Sutcliffe in 1910 and was supposed to include a men’s hostel and another large hall. It was completed in 1911 with a Reading Room, Ladies’ Club Room Committee Rooms and a kitchen. There was no bar. The prominent, rather Germanic-looking tower with pyramid was added to create a focal point Grass tennis courts were later provided In 1947 this became the ‘Brentham Club’ and provided a range of sports facilities as well as committee rooms, a bar and a billiard room. An extension was added in 2008. An intended extension with cloister and second hall were never built
Brentham Green., this was renamed Vivian Green and Henry Vivian’s’ daughter unveiled a plaque inscribed "Not 'this house is mine' but 'this estate is ours'".
Recreation ground. Land adjacent to the River Brent was identified in 1907 by Ealing Tenants and it was opened in 1908, and expanded in 1909. From 1908 it was used for social and sporting activities. By 1913 there were 12 tennis courts, tennis and cricket clubs, a bowling green, golf and croquet. Fred Perry played here as a boy.
Football ground
Miniature golf course

Neville Road
F.Cavendish Pearson for Ealing Tenants. Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties had small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments

North View
Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties had small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments. It was designed by G Lister Sutcliffe and the roughcast was left unpainted and windows were all painted in the same dark green

Pitshanger Lane
Named from a house called ‘Pitch-hanger’ in 1822. It means a ‘wooded slope of the area called Pyttel',
Small but flamboyant contemporary shopping arcade with much yellow terracotta, 1909 by S.H. Burward. 
The Village Inn

River Brent
Weir
Brentham Meadows, Brent River Park, Ealing. This open space is kept as a hay meadow, cut once a year so wildflowers and insects can flourish. The photo is taken where Western Avenue crosses the River Brent.

Ruskin Gardens
Part of the second phase of the Ealing Tenants’ estate which took on the principles of the Garden City movement, with curving roads. The cottage-style properties have small front gardens with back alleys to areas of land with allotments

Western Avenue
Aladdin Building. This was built for Aladdin Industries UK. Aladdin was and is an American lighting and heating company manufacturing equipment largely based on oil/paraffin as a fuel source... Its UK section was set up in 1919. With its prominent tower it was built in 1932 to the designs of C.Nicholas and J.E. Dixon-Spain.  The building has had a number of uses since and the original building is now largely the frontage with modern big shed store at the rear.
St John Fisher Roman Catholic church
Sir John Fisher Roman Catholic primary school
Valve house – accessed from a frontage next to the Presbytery and stands between it and the school. However it predates even the road and was there in the 1920s. It stands on a long strip of green covering a pipetrack belonging to Thames Water which runs from Alperton Sports Ground to the Hoover Factory and is behind fancy iron fencing.

Winscombe Crescent
1-7 focal building using brown brick and detailing,

Woodfield Avenue
One of the first roads on the Ealing Tenants Estate. Built 1901. The line of trees in the back gardens were field trees in a hedge which once divided the two original fields

Woodfield Crescent
One of the first roads on the Ealing Tenants Estate. Built 1901.  The bend in it softens the grid layout.
15 Home of estate architect F Cavendish Pearson,

Woodfield Road
2--14 by W. Swith.
33 used as the Institute until the building in Brentham Way were completed.
71-87 Vivian Terrace. The first houses built on the estate. 1901, named by Henry Vivian the guiding light in the enterprise.  They were built before Parker and Unwin were involved and are thus in a grid pattern and predate Hampstead Garden Suburb

Sources
Grace’s Guide. Web site
London Borough of Brent. Web site
London Borough of Ealing. Web site
London Gardens Online. Web site.
Pevsner and Cherry. North West London
Pioneer Co-partnership Suburb

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