Saturday, 21 December 2013

River Pinn Ickenham

River Pinn
The Pinn flows southwards

Post to the north Breakspear Road
Post to the south Swakeleys

Bushey Road
Breakspear Junior and Infant School. In 1937 infants in the village hall and the juniors at Long Lane were transferred to the new Breakspear Primary Junior and Infant School.

Celandine Walk
A walking route along the River Pinn. This section through a series of river meadows in public ownership.  This results from a planning agreement with Stedman and Cross in 1924 (latterly Stedman alone) with Uxbridge Urban District Council. Land along the river was to be conveyed to the Council five years after the agreement, to be kept as public open space. In return only dwelling houses were to be built, except for designated areas with an average density of six to the acre.
Pynchester Moat is a Scheduled Ancient Monument east of Copthall Road West and was a moat surrounding a manor house. It is thought that the building was called Pynchester and owned by the Hastings family in the 16th.
Greenway
The first private housing built in Ickenham was built here as part of the Drummond Estate,
Canal feeder passes under it in a tunnel
High Road
St.Giles
. The parish church dates from the 14th. The walls are of flint, rubble and brick, and part covered in concrete The porch was probably built around 1500 with walls were laid on rafts of brushwood to take the weight of the roof.  The bell turret was added in the 15th and is covered with wooden shingles.  There is a chime of three bells; the tenor was cast by Thomas Bullisden of London in 1510 and has the inscription “Sancte Necolae ora pro nobis". Another bell is 17th, cast by Philip Wightman of London, with the inscription "M.I.P. M.X. X.W. I.P H." with impressions of coins. The treble bell has an inscription "Robertus Mott. Me fecit 1589". There was from 1962 a small organ by Manders and a few pipes from the old 18th organ were incorporated. In 1983 an Allen computer organ was installed and there is also a chamber organ. St. John's Chapel was added as a mortuary 1640-50 and the niches were occupied by coffins which were later buried and the interred. The mortuary chamber was used as a vestry until 1958 and is now a chapel. There are some 14th windows, and with some 16th graffiti, and some medieval murals. A Jacobean font is thought to have come from Swakeleys House, where it had been used as a tea caddy or a work table. Two modern stained glass windows commemorate local families killed in accidents. There is also a plaque to the man who installed woodwork here. There is a memorial book with the names of parishioners killed in the Second World War with a memorial alongside. Another wall table commemorates those killed in the Great War. And there is also a window for the services of the Middlesex Regiment, and of the service of the Home Guard during the Second World War.  There is an important 17th monument of a shrouded baby and other major monuments and brasses.
Churchyard. The churchyard has some good 18th table-tombs and a flagstaff erected for King George V's Silver Jubilee with a stone base with carvings of trees
St Giles Church Hall
Village green
, with a pond and fronted by a small strip of pretty garden. Adjacent to the pump is a tulip tree and rose beds commemorating the Silver Jubilee of the Ickenham Women's Institute 1924-74.
Pond. The village pond was dug at the same time as the well for the pump was sunk and used to tip waste from the construction
Ickenham pump. Installed in 1866 as part of the Charlotte Gill bequest. It is a cast iron pump with Gothic tracery under an octagonal hood of patterned tiles with a weather vane.
The Old Fox. Early 20th pub in brick with mock timber framing. This former Harman’s house is now the only tenanted pub in the village and it is a football themed pub with many old programmes, tickets, caps and scarves around. It was called Champions until 2007.

Hoylake Crescent
Part of the estate of Ivy House farm which was developed by The West Middlesex Development Co. through an agreement of 1927 with Uxbridge Urban District Council.  With a housing density of 12 to the acre.

Ivyhouse Road
This is named for Ivy House Farm which stood on the north side of Swakeleys Road at the junction with Copthall Road. Demolished in the 1930s by developers.
Laid out by Cross and Stedman in the 1920s following purchase and dismantling of the Swakeleys estate. Building plots were then sold along the road.

Mad Field  Covert
This is a stand of oak and ash woodland. The ground flora is bramble.

Oak Avenue
The first private housing built in Ickenham was built here as part of the Drummond Estate,

Parkfield Road
The first private housing built in Ickenham was built here as part of the Drummond Estate,

Railway
Great Western Railway
Canal Feeder. This predates the railway and passes under it in a tunnel alongside which is a larger tunnel for cattle.

Swakleys Road
In 1937 Swakeley's Road was opened on the course of a much earlier thoroughfare offering a different route into Uxbridge.Church Farm at the western end was demolished and replaced with shops
The Tichenham Inn. Wetherspoons pub in a shop unit. Tichenham is how this area was recorded in the Domesday Book
United Reformed Church. Non-conformity in Ickenham goes back to 1831, with services n a local cottage. In 1834 a chapel was built in the High Road and later a schoolroom and another hall were added but it was part of the Providence Church, Uxbridge until 1919.  As the population grew in the 1920s the chapel became too small. A new building was opened in 1936 and has been used since.
Charlotte Gell almshouses. Bequest of some of her land and money in 1857. In 1857 Gell had also donated some of her land near the Church for five almshouses for longstanding servants of the Gell household or Ickenham residents who were members of the Church of England. The cottages are maintained by the church.
Village Hall. The Village Hall was built on part of Church Farm’s land and officially opened in 1927 by Princess Victoria, sister of George V. It was originally used as a school and in the Second World War was a British restaurant.

The Avenue
Laid out by Cross and Stedman in the 1920s following purchase and dismantling of the Swakeleys estate. It runs along what was the drive to from Back Lane to Swakeleys House. Building plots were then sold along the new road

Thornhill Road
Laid out by Cross and Stedman in the 1920s following purchase and dismantling of the Swakeleys estate. Building plots were then sold along the new road

Wallasey Crescent
Part of the estate of Ivy House farm which was developed by The West Middlesex Development Co. through an agreement of 1927 with Uxbridge Urban District Council.  With a housing density of 12 to the acre.

Sources
British History. Ickenham. On Line. Web site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
CAMRA West Middlesex. Web site
Clunn. The Face of London
Department of Transport Web site
Ickenham Online. Web site
Ickenham Village Hall. Web site
London Encyclopaedia
London Gardens Online. Web site
Field. London Place Names,  
Middlesex County Council. History of Middlesex
Pevsner and Cherry. North West London
Stevenson. Middlesex
St.Giles Church. Web site
Walford. Village London
Wetherspoons. Web site
Wikipedia. Ickenham. Web site

No comments: