Saturday, 25 January 2014

North London Line Railway Dalston

North London Line
The railway continues northwards
TQ 33881 84511

Inner city suburban area with schools and churches along with much local authority housing, and speculative 19th developments now become fashionable.


(For reasons of space – these very intensive inner city squares will be divided into quarters – the south  east quarter for this square.)

Post to the south Haggerston
Post to the north Dalston Junction

Acer Road
The current Acer Road is a new cut through with new build housing as part of the 2011 Holly Street Regeneration Project. Acer Road has however moved about a bit – relatively recently it was part of Richmond Road, and previously elsewhere.

Albion Drive.
Queensbridge Primary School. London School Board School Opened in 1898 as Queen's Road School. It is a monumental building with a four-storey central section. The type developed from the 1870s, to the three-decker compositions of T.J. Bailey in the 1890s. It was reorganised in 1923 and again in 1929 by then taking senior boys, juniors and infants. It was renamed as Queensbridge Road School in 1939. By 1951 it was primary only. It also housed the Hackney Teachers’ centre.

Albion Square
The square was inherited in 1838 by the Middleton family and Sir William Middleton commissioned the building of the square in 1844. Work was done by a local builder Islip Odell, and supervised by Middleton's surveyor, George Pownell. It has houses on three sides.  Many houses are either nationally or locally listed and a number of them maintain show piece gardens.
Gardens. In 1898 the central garden was acquired from Lady de Saumarez through grants from the Metropolitan Public Gardens Association, the Metropolitan Board of Works and the LCC. The garden was then laid out by Fanny Wilkinson, landscape gardener to the MPGA. The garden had four London plane trees planted in a square, each with a circular seat round the trunk. The Garden was given to Hackney Vestry in 1899 and it was opened by Lord Meath, Chair of the MPGA,
Garden pavilion. This is a wooden building structure with a pitched roof.
Drinking Fountain. This is a stone water fountain including a trough. There are Flower and foliage details with the initials 'PE'. The inscription reads: 'THIS GARDEN WAS LAID OUT IN 1890 FOR PUBLIC ENJOYMENT BY THE METROPOLITAN PUBLIC GARDEN ASSOCIATION LANCASTER GATE AND IN 1910 THE SAME ASSOCIATION THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF J PASSMORE EDWARDS ESQ WAS ENABLED TO COMPLETE ITS WORK BY ERECTING THERIN THIS DRINKING FOUNTAIN FOR FREE PUBLIC USE WHICH THE METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL OF HACKNEY HAS KINDLY AGREED TO MAINTAIN.

Albion Terrace
Albion Hall. This was on the west side and the housed the Kingsland, Dalston and De Beauvoir Town Scientific Institution in 1850. It was leased to the London County Council from 1906, but it is now demolished.  There is now pastiche housing on the site built in 1994
Albion Baths. This was a privately owned pool built in the 1860s. It was closed by the 1890s and taken over by the London School Board to use as an educational facility.  It was bombed in 1944 and later demolished to be replaced by pre-fabs.  There is now pastiche housing on the site.

Beehive Close
Beehive was the name of a pub in Holly Street
Evergreen Play Association. Adventure playground

Evergreen Square
Playspace by Snug and Outdoor. Half the square is a dynamic play space and the other half provides a more peaceful environment. A poem by Chris Meade and primary school pupils is in the paving, the benches and in steel panels at the entrances.

Frederick Terrace
This is a narrow passage alongside the railway and slum cleared in the 1930s.  Railway arches with businesses in them.

Glebe Road
A long narrow passage alongside the railway paved with granite setts. Works and warehouses along it are now light industry and studios.

Haggerston Road
All Saints.  This was built in 1855-6 designed by Philip Hardwick. It has a ragstone exterior with decorated windows. The aisles were rebuilt and extended with galleries by T. E. Knightley, with galleries on iron columns. In 1998, it became a United Benefice with Holy Trinity with St Philip, Dalston
War Memorial.  This is in the churchyard and is a cross. On the base is written “To the greater glory of God and in proud and thankful memory of the men of this church and parish who laid down their lives in the Great War 1914 – 1919”.
Stonebridge common. In 1883 the triangular area in the north of today’s park was given to the Hackney Board of Works and protected under the London Squares and Enclosures Preservation Act of 1906. This was an asphalt playground with trees round the border'. This area is now paved with an obelisk in the middle.
Stonebridge Gardens.  Play park with a large blue snake installed by Free Form in 1981. It is named from a stone bridge that crossed the Pigwell Stream here and marked the boundary between the parishes of Hackney and Shoreditch. It was created after post-war house clearance.
Stairs up to the railway with locked gate
Railway bridge – this bridge on the original North London Line Kingsland Viaduct has had a replacement deck for the Overground line. Under the bridge the road is lowered below the level of the pavements and the surrounding houses to allow taller vehicles to pass under
260 Duke of Wellington. Courage pub used by locals for local events

Holly Street
Holly Street Estate. This was completed in 1968. Its centrepiece was a U-shaped group of maisonettes; plus four twenty-storey system-built towers. In 1993 two of the towers were demolished, and a year programme was begun of low-rise rebuilding and rehabilitation by Levin Bernstein.
Terrace housing 1948 by the Borough Engineer, George Downing
30 Queensbridge Sports and Community Centre

Jacaranda Grove
The road is built on the site of Orchard Cottage, later, in the early 20th infirmary for horses.

Mapledene Road
54 Mapledene and Stonebridge Children’s Centre

Middleton Road
Hackney Pentecostal Apostolic Church. This is in an old Congregational church and has been there since the 1970s. The Congregational church originated in Shoreditch and this building dates form 1838. It is in brick with a stone front. It closed in the late 1940s and taken over by the Pentecostal church who rebuilt the church behind the street front.
Railway bridge. The abutments have been admired. This bridge on the original North London Line Kingsland Viaduct has had a replacement deck for the Overground line. Under the bridge the road is lowered below the level of the pavements and the surrounding houses to allow taller vehicles to pass under

Queensbridge Road
355 Grange Court. This is the only remaining tower of the Holly Road estate - kept for use for elderly tenants.
LMNT Restaurant in what was the Duke of Richmond pub.

Richmond Road
3 Star House, which was previously Cleveland House. Electrical sub station, built to power the electrified railway tracks. This has been a factory and a church. It is now Dalston Department Store with event and gallery space. Powerhouse Church is also based there.
Carriage sidings side north of Richmond Road. These were located in their own section of cutting on the North London Railway, and a few yards of original track survived which before the line was rebuilt.
Dalston Methodist Church. The church was originally in Mayfield Road, to the rear of the present church and  was built by Wesleyan Methodists in 1865. The Minister's wife was killed when a flying bomb damaged the manse and church in 1945. A new church was built on the same site in 1960, but was known as Richmond Road Church.
Road bridge over the railway in a ‘dogleg’s
1 Passing Clouds. Club


Sources
Aldous. Village London
All Saints. Web site
Bridgeworks on the East London Line Extension. Web site
British History On Line. Hackney.
Clarke. Hackney, 
Clunn. The Face of London
Field. London Place Names, 
Hackney Society Newsletter
London Borough of Hackney. Web site.
London Gardens On line. Web site
London Remembers. Web site.
Pevsner and Cherry. London North
Robbins. North London Railway 
Sinclair, Hackney That Rose Red Empire
Sinclair. Lights Out for the Territory.
Willatts. Streets of Islington

No comments: